Library 101 Online Courses

Python 101
by Michael Driscoll

Learn how to program with Python from beginning to end. My book is made primarily for beginners. However, at least two-thirds of it is aimed at intermediate programmers. You may be wondering how that works. The book will be split into five parts: beginner material, the Python standard library, intermediate topics, 3rd party modules, and distribution.

Embedded Librarianship
by Alice L. Daugherty

Is the embedded librarian an equal partner in the course, or is the librarian perceived as a “value-added” extra? What is the place of technology in this effort? Is there a line librarians should not cross? Taking into account both theory and practice to discuss multiple facets of the subject, Embedded Librarianship: What Every Academic Librarian Should Know thoroughly examines these questions and more from the perspectives of experienced embedded librarian contributors who have worked in higher education settings. The chapters illuminate the benefits and challenges of embedding, explain the planning required to set up an embedded course, identify the different forms of embedding, and consider information literacy instruction in various contexts.

Readers who will benefit from this work include not only academic librarians but any professor who wants their students to be able to do better research in their fields.


101 Tips for Online Course Success
by Randy Nordell

Arm your students with the strategies they need for success with 101 Tips for Online Course Success. Many students think they are prepared for online classes, in fact they often think they will be easier than on-ground courses, but are they actually ready for the challenges that come with learning online?

Help your students manage their time, keep organized, stay motivated, use online resources, use learning management systems, work in groups, and much more!

101 Tips for Online Course Success is everything your students need to succeed in an online or hybrid course. It is their handbook and planner that can complement any online or hybrid course, regardless of the subject matter. It can also be used in student success courses that introduce students to the college experience. Most of the strategies and tips included in this text are also relevant to the onsite courses.


MOOCs Now: Everything You Need to Know to Design, Set Up, and Run a Massive Open Online Course
by Susan W. Alman, Jennifer Jumba

MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) have become popular with eager learners as well as some educators wanting to test the boundaries of learning. Understandably, many educators approach MOOCs with trepidation and a number of questions. Are MOOCs simply a fad? Does this new venue threaten traditional higher education models? How are teachers to be remunerated for their efforts? And what can be done about student retention in an anonymous venue of a MOOC?

This book answers these questions and many more, offering a practical and realistic guide to MOOCs—one that will help anyone involved in higher education to better understand MOOCs and enable them to make decisions about whether and how to offer MOOCs. The authors address topics such as the various costs of offering a MOOC (teachers, developers, licensing, and software), explain accessibility options, examine the challenges of copyright and the administration required, and explore what the librarian’s role should be. This insightful guide also explains your options for the presentation of text, video, and audio content; whether to give assignments or tests; and how to decide whether you should offer your MOOC for free or require a fee and offer a certificate upon course completion.


Exploring Digital Libraries
by Karen Calhoun

A landmark textbook on digital libraries for LIS students, educators and practising information professionals throughout the world.

Exploring Digital Libraries is a highly readable, thought-provoking authorative and in-depth  treatment of the digital library arena that provides an up-to-date overview of the progress, nature and future impact of digital libraries, from their collections and technology-centred foundations over two decades ago to their emergent,  community-centred engagement with the social web. 

This essential textbook:

• Brings students and working librarians up to date on the progress, nature and impact of digital libraries, bridging the gap since the publication of the best-known digital library texts
• Frames digital library research and practice in the context of the social web and makes the case for moving beyond collections to a new emphasis on libraries’ value to their communities
• Introduces several new frameworks and novel syntheses that elucidate digital library themes, suggest strategic directions, and break new ground in the digital library literature.
• Calls a good deal of attention to digital library research, but is written from the perspective of strategy and in-depth experience
• Provides a global perspective and integrates material from many sources in one place – the chapters on open repositories and hybrid libraries draw together past, present and prospective work in a way that is unique in the literature.

Readership: Exploring Digital Libraries suits the needs of a range of readers, from working librarians and library leaders to LIS students and educators, or anyone who wants a highly readable and thought-provoking  overview of the field and its importance to the future of libraries.


Handbook of Library Training Practice and Development
by Alan Brine

Librarians must now work at a different level from that required 20 years ago, but the training available is not always appropriate or accessible to all. The authors of this volume have responded to this significant and continuing change within the profession by offering a much-needed guide to best practice for staff training and development in library and information work. This handbook addresses new aspects of service provision both in the UK and abroad, and provides an up-to-date review of the current developments that are becoming increasingly important to librarians through the influence of the electronic age and the widening of areas of professional involvement. The Handbook of Library Training Practice and Development will be invaluable to those responsible for the development of staff and line managers as well as providing a crucial insight into the information profession for anyone new to this career path or looking to develop their knowledge within it.

Library 101
by Claire Gatrell Stephens, Patricia Franklin

This well organized handbook is a must have for new and inexperienced school librarians as they open new schools or take on that first job. It will also serve as a source of information for library professionals in guiding their clerical staff and student and parent volunteers. The handbook covers everything from library management systems to budgeting, television production, and how to collaborate with teachers. Current issues in the field (LMS role as a reading teacher and LMS role in assessment of student learning) are discussed. All issues and recommendations are viewed in an ideal setting and in a real-world setting, enabling LMS to view their situation as it is and as it may become. The basis of the work is the authors’ experience in mentoring many new librarians in Florida and their own journey to national board certification The authors have solicited short sidebar articles from noted experts in the field, as well as from practicing school librarians at all levels. These short essays add validity and expand the text. Grades K-12.


Keeping Up with Emerging Technologies: Best Practices for Information Professionals
by Nicole Hennig

Today’s librarians and information specialists know it’s imperative that they keep up with new technologies. But not all technologies are equally important, either within the library setting or to library patrons. So how does one decide which ones to pursue and integrate into services? In the uphill battle to stay current with new and emerging technologies, deciding which ones to pursue and integrate into services is a major challenge. A secondary problem is simply finding the time to consider the question. Readers of Keeping Up with Emerging Technologies will learn all of the best practices and skills to keep up with new technologies and to analyze the ability of specific technologies to meet recognized user needs—all in this single source.

You’ll learn the best ways to gather information about new technologies and user needs, to evaluate and analyze information, to curate technology information for others, to set up experiments and evaluate the results, and to present your findings to persuade decision-makers. Written by the former head of user experience at MIT’s library system, this guidebook serves information professionals, educators, education technology specialists, and anyone with “emerging technology” or “innovation” in their job titles. It will also be useful for library administrators and those who manage these positions as well as for students seeking a technology-oriented or curriculum-design career path in libraries.


Teaching Writing Online
by Scott Warnock

How can you migrate your tried and true face-to-face teaching practices into an online environment? This is the core question that Scott Warnock seeks to answer in Teaching Writing Online: How and Why. Warnock explores how to teach an online (or hybrid) writing course by emphasizing the importance of using and managing students’ written communications. Grounded in Warnock’s years of experience in teaching, teacher preparation, online learning, and composition scholarship, this book is designed with usability in mind. Features include: How to manage online conversations; Responding to students; Organizing course material; Core guidelines for teaching online; Resource chapter and appendix with sample teaching materials. – Publisher.


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