Numbers Behind Numb3Rs

The Numbers Behind NUMB3RS
by Keith J. Devlin, Gary Lorden

The companion to the hit CBS crime series Numb3rs presents the fascinating way mathematics is used to fight real-life crime

Using the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series Numb3rs as a springboard, Keith Devlin (known to millions of NPR listeners as ?the Math Guy? on NPR?s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon) and Gary Lorden (the principal math advisor to Numb3rs) explain real-life mathematical techniques used by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch and convict criminals. From forensics to counterterrorism, the Riemann hypothesis to image enhancement, solving murders to beating casinos, Devlin and Lorden present compelling cases that illustrate how advanced mathematics can be used in state-of-the-art criminal investigations.


The Numbers Behind NUMB3RS
by Keith Devlin, Gary Lorden

The companion to the hit CBS crime series Numb3rs presents the fascinating way mathematics is used to fight real-life crime

Using the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series Numb3rs as a springboard, Keith Devlin (known to millions of NPR listeners as the Math Guy on NPR’s Weekend Edition with Scott Simon) and Gary Lorden (the principal math advisor to Numb3rs) explain real-life mathematical techniques used by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch and convict criminals. From forensics to counterterrorism, the Riemann hypothesis to image enhancement, solving murders to beating casinos, Devlin and Lorden present compelling cases that illustrate how advanced mathematics can be used in state-of-the-art criminal investigations.


Charlie Numbers and the Man in the Moon
by Ben Mezrich, Tonya Mezrich

Charlie is recruited to use his mathematical prowess to discover what happened to a box of stolen moon rocks in this follow up to Bringing Down the Mouse.

The Kid: Charlie Lewis, a.k.a. Numbers. The smartest kids in sixth grade. Charlie sees the world as a series of math problems—ones that can be solved, if you know the right equations.

The Team: The Whiz Kids. Charlie’s best friends are joining him undercover to recover missing moon rocks, which have disappeared from NASA’s vaults.

The Target: Aerospace Infinity, the company owned by former astronaut Buzz Caldwell and hosting organization of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum’s paper airplane contest. Working together, the Whiz Kids must master the principles of aerodynamics, wind science, and gravity to win the contest to get closer to their target.

The Catch: Nothing is ever as it seems, and Charlie suspects the mission is being led by someone who isn’t what she claims to be. And messing with the government could jeopardize their futures…


Mathematics and the Search for Knowledge
by Morris Kline

Mad River Road:After spending a year in prison, Ralph Fisher has explicit plans for his first night of freedom: tonight, someone will be held accountable. He goes to murderous lengths to obtain the address of his former wife – the woman he blames for his fate and against whom he has sworn vengeance. Determined to bring her to his idea of justice, Ralph’s next step is to travel from Florida’s sandy beaches to Dayton, Ohio, where his ex-wife is struggling to make ends meet on Mad River Road.Also in Florida, Jamie Kellogg wakes from an agonizing nightmare of her mother’s funeral, and assesses her life: a pretty but unaccomplished twenty-nine-year-old woman in a dead-end job, with an ex-husband in Atlanta, a married lover in the hospital, and a virtual stranger in her bed. But this stranger is everything the previous men in her life weren’t: tender, attentive, and adventurous. After convincing Jamie to quit her miserable job and ditch her judgmental, perfectionist sister, he proposes a romantic getaway. While Jamie wonders if this thrilling man might finally be her Prince Charming, they plan a road trip to visit his son, who lives with his mother on a street called Mad River Road…Heartstopper:Welcome to Torrance, Florida. Population: 4,160. As Sheriff John Weber would attest, the deadliest predators to date in his tiny hamlet were the alligators lurking in the nearby swamps. But that was before someone abducted and murdered a runaway teenage girl…and before the disappearance of popular and pretty Liana Martin. The pattern is chilling to Sandy Crosbie, the town’s new high school English teacher. With a marriage on the rocks, thanks to her husband’s online affairs, and a beautiful teenage daughter to protect, Sandy wishes she’d never come to the seemingly quiet town with shocking depths of scandal, sex, and brutality roiling beneath its surface. And as Sheriff Weber digs up more questions than answers in a dead-end investigation, one truth emerges: the prettiest ones are being targeted, the heartstoppers. And this killer intends to give them their due….Alternating between the chilling journal entries of a cold-blooded murderer and the sizzling scandals of small-town life, Heartstopper is Joy Fielding’s most exciting novel of suspense yet.

Retire the Colors
by Dario DiBattista

The impact of war, and the lingering aftereffect it has on both veterans and civilians, is—for myriad reasons—largely invisible to the public. Popular media may create news cycles around horrors or stereotypes, but the effort required to redefine and sustain “normal” lives after war stays below the surface and out of sight. In Retire the Colors, nineteen thought-provoking stories by veterans and civilians consider the residual effects of Iraq and Afghanistan. A pacifist describes her decision to accompany her husband, an Iraq veteran, to the shooting range. A hospital worker in Mosul talks about what happens on a hunting trip back home with his grandfather. A veteran experiences the 2013 Boston marathon. The wife of a combat medic considers their unusual nighttime routines. A mother and former 50 cal gunner navigates truth and lies with her children. These stories offer a grace uncommon in war literature today. They also make an appeal to readers: to witness with compassion the men and women who—because of war—possess the strength to show us what it means to be fully human. Contributors include: Tahani Alsandook, Joseph R. Bawden, Brian Castner, David Chrisinger, David P. Ervin, Teresa Fazio, CH Guise, Colin D. Halloran, Lauren Kay Halloran, Matthew J. Hefti, Brooke King, Randy Leonard, Eva KL Miller, Stewart Moss, Caitlin Pendola, Mark Solheim, Richard Allen Smith, Christopher Stowe, and Melissa Walker.

The Man of Numbers
by Keith Devlin

The story of the man who introduced Hindu-Arabic numerals and the concept of zero to Europe that transformed business in the late Middle Ages and paved the way for the commercial and cultural explosion of the Renaissance

Mathematics
by Keith J. Devlin

Mathematics: The New Golden Age offers a glimpse of the extraordinary vistas and bizarre universes opened up by contemporary mathematicians: Hilbert’s tenth problem and the four-color theorem, Gaussian integers, chaotic dynamics and the Mandelbrot set, infinite numbers, and strange number systems. Why a “new golden age”? According to Keith Devlin, we are currently witnessing an astronomical amount of mathematical research. Charting the most significant developments that have taken place in mathematics since 1960, Devlin expertly describes these advances for the interested layperson and adroitly summarizes their significance as he leads the reader into the heart of the most interesting mathematical perplexities — from the biggest known prime number to the Shimura-Taniyama conjecture for Fermat’s Last Theorem.

Revised and updated to take into account dramatic developments of the 1980s and 1990s, Mathematics: The New Golden Age includes, in addition to Fermat’s Last Theorem, major new sections on knots and topology, and the mathematics of the physical universe.

Devlin portrays mathematics not as a collection of procedures for solving problems, but as a unified part of human culture, as part of mankind’s eternal quest to understand ourselves and the world in which we live. Though a genuine science, mathematics has strong artistic elements as well; this creativity is in evidence here as Devlin shows what mathematicians do — and reveals that it has little to do with numbers and arithmetic. This book brilliantly captures the fascinating new age of mathematics.


The Numbers Game
by Michael Blastland, A. W. Dilnot

The Strunk & White of statistics team up to help the average person navigate the numbers in the news.
Drawing on their hugely popular BBC Radio 4 show “More or Less, ,” journalist Michael Blastland and internationally known economist Andrew Dilnot delight, amuse, and convert American mathphobes by showing how our everyday experiences make sense of numbers.
The radical premise of “The Numbers Game” is to show how much we already know, and give practical ways to use our knowledge to become cannier consumers of the media. In each concise chapter, the authors take on a different theme?such as size, chance, averages, targets, risk, measurement, and data?and present it as a memorable and entertaining story.
If you?ve ever wondered what ?average? really means, whether the scare stories about cancer risk should convince you to change your behavior, or whether a story you read in the paper is biased (and how), you need this book. Blastland and Dilnot show how to survive and thrive on the torrent of numbers that pours through everyday life. It’s the essential guide to every cause you love or hate, and every issue you follow, in the language everyone uses.

Mathematics in Popular Culture
by Jessica K. Sklar, Elizabeth S. Sklar

Mathematics has maintained a surprising presence in popular media for over a century. In recent years, the movies Good Will Hunting, A Beautiful Mind, and Stand and Deliver, the stage plays Breaking the Code and Proof, the novella Flatland and the hugely successful television crime series NUMB3RS all weave mathematics prominently into their storylines. Less obvious but pivotal references to the subject appear in the blockbuster TV show Lost, the cult movie The Princess Bride, and even Tolstoy’s War and Peace. In this collection of new essays, contributors consider the role of math in everything from films, baseball, crossword puzzles, fantasy role-playing games, and television shows to science fiction tales, award-winning plays and classic works of literature. Revealing the broad range of intersections between mathematics and mainstream culture, this collection demonstrates that even “mass entertainment” can have a hidden depth.

Teaching Mathematics Using Popular Culture
by Elana Reiser

Mathematics teachers often struggle to motivate their students. One way to cultivate and maintain student interest is for teachers to incorporate popular media into their methodology. Organized on the subject strands of the Common Core, this book explores math concepts featured in contemporary films and television shows and offers numerous examples high school math teachers can use to design lessons using pop culture references. Outlines for lessons are provided along with background stories and historical references.


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