Book About American Economy

Government and the American Economy
by Price V. Fishback

The American economy has provided a level of well-being that has consistently ranked at or near the top of the international ladder. A key source of this success has been widespread participation in political and economic processes. In The Government and the American Economy, leading economic historians chronicle the significance of America’s open-access society and the roles played by government in its unrivaled success story.

America’s democratic experiment, the authors show, allowed individuals and interest groups to shape the structure and policies of government, which, in turn, have fostered economic success and innovation by emphasizing private property rights, the rule of law, and protections of individual freedom. In response to new demands for infrastructure, America’s federal structure hastened development by promoting the primacy of states, cities, and national governments. More recently, the economic reach of American government expanded dramatically as the populace accepted stronger limits on its economic freedoms in exchange for the increased security provided by regulation, an expanded welfare state, and a stronger national defense.


Building the New American Economy
by Jeffrey D. Sachs

In this passionate and powerful book—part manifesto, part plan of action—the renowned economist Jeffrey D. Sachs offers a practical strategy to move America, seemingly more divided than ever, toward a new consensus: sustainable development. Sustainable development is a holistic approach that emphasizes economic, social, and environmental objectives in shaping policy. In focusing too much on economic growth, the United States has neglected rising economic inequality and dire environmental threats. Now, even growth is imperiled.

Sachs explores issues that have captivated the nation and political debate, including infrastructure, trade deals, energy policy, the proper size and role of government, the national debt, and income inequality. Not only does he provide illuminating and accessible explanations of the forces at work in each case, but he also presents specific policy solutions. His argument rises above the pessimism born of political paralysis, economic stagnation, and partisanship to devise a brighter way forward, achievable both individually and collectively. In Building the New American Economy, Sachs shows how the United States can find a path to renewed economic progress that is fair and environmentally sustainable.


History of American Economy
by Gary M. Walton, Hugh Rockoff

Ever wonder how the American economy became the most powerful one in the world? Tying America’s past to the economic policies of today and beyond, the popular HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY, 13E answers this critical question and more, presenting events chronologically for easy understanding. This prestigious book has been used by more learners than any other of its kind in the U.S. Market-leading HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY has helped generations of learners understand how the American economy evolved. Completely updated with recent research by economic historians, this trusted book ties this country’s past to the policies and debates of today and beyond. Visual aids, tables and graphs reinforce learning and encourage interest in the study of economic history.
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The American Economy
by Cynthia Clark Northrup

Based on a work originally published in 2003, The American Economy: A Historical Encyclopedia has been thoroughly updated with information on the accounting scandals of the early 2000s and the recession of 2008, including the government stimulus and bailout programs and the recession’s impact on key markets.

With more than 600 short entries, 31 longer essays, and 32 primary source documents, the encyclopedia spans American history from colonial times to the present. Researchers will discover detailed information on people, events, and government actions that have shaped our economy, with entries on such seminal issues as slavery, migration patterns, the welfare state, the rise of the city, and the development of financial institutions. Throughout, special attention is paid to the interdependence of economics with political, social, and cultural forces. Covering everything from the national debt to monetary policy, law, unemployment, inflation, and government/business relations, this work is the ideal go-to resource for quick answers, in-depth analysis, or direction for further research.


The Next American Economy
by William J. Holstein

At a time when debate is raging about how to create jobs and revive the American economy, veteran business writer William J. Holstein argues that the best way for us to recover our economic footing is to do what Americans do best-innovate and create new industries. Contrary to the perception that the American economy has run out of inspiration and new ideas, Holstein uses compelling case studies to celebrate the innovation and business success being experienced in many industries, from technology and energy to retraining and exporting, across the country, from Boston to Orlando, Pittsburgh to San Diego.

In the face of economic powerhouses such as Japan and China that are pursuing conscious national strategies, Holstein argues that Americans must find new avenues of cooperation among universities, business, and government to create the kind of sustainable growth we need. Replete with fresh insights into how Americans can create a real economic recovery, The Next American Economy is essential reading for business leaders, politicians, strategists, and anyone who cares about our future.


The Great American Economy
by Stephen L. Slavin

Many Americans feel that the economy is no longer working for them and that “the American Dream” has become a sham. This book explains the underlying reasons for this gloomy outlook and lays out a clear plan for making the American economy work for everyone, not just the one percent.

The heart of the problem, says economist Steve Slavin, is gross inefficiency. Since the end of World War II, America has been wasting vast amounts of its resources. As examples he cites the following key sectors-

.Healthcare–we spend nearly twice as much as other industrialized nations but achieve no better results;

.Education–just half of our eighteen-year-olds can function at an eighth-grade level, while many European and Asian countries do far better educating their young people;

.Transportation–by relying on cars instead of mass transit, we spend much more than comparable nations;

.The military–several decades after the Cold War our military budget continues to be almost 40 percent of the world’s total military spending, while few politicians ever question the necessity for such massive outlays.

In these areas and other sectors of the economy, Slavin proposes sweeping changes to eliminate inefficiency. These would include a restructuring of our healthcare system to make it affordable for all, a major push toward public transportation, increased emphasis on quality results from our education system, ways to eliminate waste throughout our vast military-industrial complex, and a renewed emphasis on manufacturing.

Refreshingly clear and readable, The Great American Economywill appeal to readers who want to learn what went wrong with our economy and how to fix it.


The Selling of the American Economy
by Micheline Maynard

Today, many Americans regard globalization as a significant threat to our work force, and to our very way of life. As unemployment soars, the American automotive and manufacturing industries crumble, countless jobs continue to ship overseas, and the retail sector faces the worst slump in decades, cries of “Buy American” have grown louder and louder – in our communities, in the headlines, and in the halls of Washington. But at a time when an Italian company has bailed out one of our oldest and most iconic automakers; a French-German consortium is closing in on a multibillion dollar military contract to build our tanker planes and helicopters; companies based everywhere from Switzerland to India to Belgium are stocking our grocery aisles; and the assets of some of our most venerable financial institutions have been stripped down and bought up by banks from Hong Kong and London, what does “Buy American” mean any more?

That said, there is a great deal of discomfort about the influence that foreign companies are exerting on our economy. Are they making us more competitive in the global marketplace, or less? Are they creating jobs for Americans, or importing their own workforces? Are they a threat to our national security, or are they bringing us technology that actually makes us safer? When they open plants and factories on our shores, are they siphoning money from our economy, or bolstering it? In welcoming their investments, are we, as some critics contend, selling our economy to the highest bidder?

In THE SELLING OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY, New York Times senior business correspondent Micheline Maynard argues that despite the lingering xenophobia that colors American perception of foreign-owned companies, foreign investments are actually an overwhelmingly positive force. Not only do they create thousands of jobs and pump billions of dollars into national and local economies, she says, they reinvigorate and strengthen communities, foster innovation and diversity in the marketplace, and teach Americans new ways to live and work.

At a time when our most cherished home-grown institutions, still reeling from the financial crisis, are downsizing, shuttering plants and factories, and filing for bankruptcy, the need for foreign investment has never been greater. In this compelling narrative, Maynard shows that if we are in fact selling our economy to the highest bidder, this may be very good news for America.

Through moving stories of workers whose lives have been transformed by the arrival of companies like Toyota, Airbus, and Tata, probing interviews with a host of government officials and local leaders who have fought to lure foreign companies to their communities and states, and revealing conversations with both American and foreign executives (including a rare and hard-won visit with Toyota’s elusive young new president) Maynard paints a fascinating portrait of the paradigm shift that is transforming the American economy – and remaking the American dream.


The American Economy: Essays and primary source documents
by Cynthia Clark Northrup

A comprehensive collection of entries, essays, and primary source documents emphasizing the importance of economic policy in all aspects of life in the United States.

* Over 500 A-Z entries on key ideas, initiatives, people, and events in the history of U.S. economic policy

* 31 in-depth essays on core economic issues and trends

* 19 primary source documents, from Alexander Hamilton’s Report on the Subject of Manufactures to the Panama Canal Treaties of 1903 and 1977

* Charts that illustrate the information


The Bank of the United States and the American Economy
by Edward Kaplan

An account of the history, structure, and operation of the First and Second Banks of the United States, this study examines how the banks performed as national and central institutions, and what happened to the economy when the charter of the Second Bank was allowed to expire in 1836. Historians have paid little recent attention to the early history of central banking in the United States, and many Americans believe that the Federal Reserve, created in 1913, was our first central bank. The economic crisis during the American Revolution actually led to the founding of a national bank, called the Bank of North America, during the period of Confederation. Although it became a private bank before the Constitution was ratified in 1788, it proved to be such a success that in 1791 Alexander Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury, was able to convince President Washington that a similar bank should be established.

While the First Bank of the United States performed well during its tenure, its charter was allowed to lapse in 1811. A Second Bank of the United States was created five years later in 1816, and it prospered under the leadership of its third president, Nicholas Biddle, from 1823 to 1830, when central banking was practiced. This success ended with the 1828 election of Andrew Jackson, who refused to recharter the bank and withdrew the government’s funds in 1833. Severely weakened, the Bank continued, but its charter finally expired in 1836, much to Biddle’s dismay.


American Economic History
by Seymour E. Harris

Harris (1897-1974) was editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics . In this 1961 anthology (reproduced with no changes or additions) he presented 16 articles that represented some of the prominent mainstream thinking of the time on broad issues of American economic development. The material ex


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