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Moon Alaska
by Lisa Maloney

Moon Travel Guides: Make Your Escape!

Remote, wild, and all-around otherworldly, Alaska promises unforgettable adventure. Discover the heart of “The Last Frontier” with Moon Alaska.

What you’ll find in Moon Alaska:

  • Strategic itineraries for every budget and timeline, whether you have a week to hit the top sights or a month to explore the whole state
  • Full-color photos and detailed maps throughout, plus a full-color foldout map
  • Curated advice for outdoor adventurers, history buffs, culture mavens, road-trippers, wildlife enthusiasts, and more
  • Must-see attractions and off-beat ideas for making the most of your trip: Embark on a guided active glacier hike, explore ice caves, or take an intrepid “flightseeing” tour to secluded glacier landings in Denali National Park. Experience the thrill of spotting wild bears, moose, or even walrus, or catch a glimpse of sea otters and humpback whales on a boat tour of the spectacular Kenai Fjords. Hike through lush wilderness or along pristine beaches, kayak on tranquil sounds or secluded lakes, or camp under the crystal-clear stars. Learn about Alaska’s native cultures and quirky small towns, savor a freshly-caught seafood dinner, and discover the best spots to witness the enchanting northern lights
  • Honest advice from Anchorage local and outdoor aficionado Lisa Maloney on when to go, what to pack, and where to stay, from campsites and hostels to B&Bs and resort fishing lodges
  • How to get there and get around by plane, train, ferry, cruise ship, or guided tour
  • Recommendations for families, LGBTQ+ travelers, seniors, international visitors, and travelers with disabilities
  • Thorough background on the culture, weather, wildlife, local laws, history, and health and safety

With Moon Alaska’s local insight, myriad activities, and expert advice, you can plan your trip your way.

Full list of coverage: Juneau and Southeast Alaska, Anchorage and Southcentral Alaska, Denali, Fairbanks, and the Interior, Kodiak and Southwest Alaska, the Arctic

Can’t get enough of Alaska? Try Moon Anchorage, Denali & the Kenai Peninsula. Headed to Canada? Try Moon Vancouver & Canadian Rockies Road Trip or Moon Banff National Park.


The Selling of the American Economy
by Micheline Maynard

Today, many Americans regard globalization as a significant threat to our work force, and to our very way of life. As unemployment soars, the American automotive and manufacturing industries crumble, countless jobs continue to ship overseas, and the retail sector faces the worst slump in decades, cries of “Buy American” have grown louder and louder – in our communities, in the headlines, and in the halls of Washington. But at a time when an Italian company has bailed out one of our oldest and most iconic automakers; a French-German consortium is closing in on a multibillion dollar military contract to build our tanker planes and helicopters; companies based everywhere from Switzerland to India to Belgium are stocking our grocery aisles; and the assets of some of our most venerable financial institutions have been stripped down and bought up by banks from Hong Kong and London, what does “Buy American” mean any more?

That said, there is a great deal of discomfort about the influence that foreign companies are exerting on our economy. Are they making us more competitive in the global marketplace, or less? Are they creating jobs for Americans, or importing their own workforces? Are they a threat to our national security, or are they bringing us technology that actually makes us safer? When they open plants and factories on our shores, are they siphoning money from our economy, or bolstering it? In welcoming their investments, are we, as some critics contend, selling our economy to the highest bidder?

In THE SELLING OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY, New York Times senior business correspondent Micheline Maynard argues that despite the lingering xenophobia that colors American perception of foreign-owned companies, foreign investments are actually an overwhelmingly positive force. Not only do they create thousands of jobs and pump billions of dollars into national and local economies, she says, they reinvigorate and strengthen communities, foster innovation and diversity in the marketplace, and teach Americans new ways to live and work.

At a time when our most cherished home-grown institutions, still reeling from the financial crisis, are downsizing, shuttering plants and factories, and filing for bankruptcy, the need for foreign investment has never been greater. In this compelling narrative, Maynard shows that if we are in fact selling our economy to the highest bidder, this may be very good news for America.

Through moving stories of workers whose lives have been transformed by the arrival of companies like Toyota, Airbus, and Tata, probing interviews with a host of government officials and local leaders who have fought to lure foreign companies to their communities and states, and revealing conversations with both American and foreign executives (including a rare and hard-won visit with Toyota’s elusive young new president) Maynard paints a fascinating portrait of the paradigm shift that is transforming the American economy – and remaking the American dream.


An Extraordinary Time
by Marc Levinson

The decades after World War II were a golden age across much of the world. It was a time of economic miracles, an era when steady jobs were easy to find and families could see their living standards improving year after year. And then, around 1973, the good times vanished. The world economy slumped badly, then settled into the slow, erratic growth that had been the norm before the war. The result was an era of anxiety, uncertainty, and political extremism that we are still grappling with today.

In An Extraordinary Time, acclaimed economic historian Marc Levinson describes how the end of the postwar boom reverberated throughout the global economy, bringing energy shortages, financial crises, soaring unemployment, and a gnawing sense of insecurity. Politicians, suddenly unable to deliver the prosperity of years past, railed haplessly against currency speculators, oil sheikhs, and other forces they could not control. From Sweden to Southern California, citizens grew suspicious of their newly ineffective governments and rebelled against the high taxes needed to support social welfare programs enacted when coffers were flush.

Almost everywhere, the pendulum swung to the right, bringing politicians like Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan to power. But their promise that deregulation, privatization, lower tax rates, and smaller government would restore economic security and robust growth proved unfounded. Although the guiding hand of the state could no longer deliver the steady economic performance the public had come to expect, free-market policies were equally unable to do so. The golden age would not come back again.

A sweeping reappraisal of the last sixty years of world history, An Extraordinary Time forces us to come to terms with how little control we actually have over the economy.


A Nation of Nations
by Tom Gjelten

“An incisive look at immigration, assimilation, and national identity” (Kirkus Reviews) and the landmark immigration law that transformed the face of the nation more than fifty years ago, as told through the stories of immigrant families in one suburban county in Virginia.

In the years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the foreign-born population of the United States has tripled. Americans today are vastly more diverse than ever. They look different, speak different languages, practice different religions, eat different foods, and enjoy different cultures.

In 1950, Fairfax County, Virginia, was ninety percent white, ten percent African-American, with a little more than one hundred families who were “other.” Currently the Anglo white population is less than fifty percent, and there are families of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American origin living all over the county. “In A Nation of Nations, National Public Radio correspondent Tom Gjelten brings these changes to life” (The Wall Street Journal), following a few immigrants to Fairfax County over recent decades as they gradually “Americanize.” Hailing from Korea, Bolivia, and Libya, the families included illustrate common immigrant themes: friction between minorities, economic competition and entrepreneurship, and racial and cultural stereotyping.

It’s been half a century since the Immigration and Nationality Act changed the landscape of America, and no book has assessed the impact or importance of this law as A Nation of Nations. With these “powerful human stories…Gjelten has produced a compelling and informative account of the impact of the 1965 reforms, one that is indispensable reading at a time when anti-immigrant demagoguery has again found its way onto the main stage of political discourse” (The Washington Post).


The Experience Economy
by B. Joseph Pine, James H. Gilmore

In 1999, Joseph Pine and James Gilmore offered this idea to readers as a new way to think about connecting with customers and securing their loyalty. As a result, their book The Experience Economy is now a classic, embraced by readers and companies worldwide and read in more than a dozen languages.

And though the world has changed in many ways since then, the way to a customer’s heart has not. In fact, the idea of staging experiences to leave a memorable–and lucrative–impression is now more relevant than ever. With an ongoing torrent of brands attacking consumers from all sides, how do you make yours stand out?

Welcome to the new Experience Economy. With this fully updated edition of the book, Pine and Gilmore make an even stronger case that experience is the missing link between a company and its potential audience. It offers new rich examples–including the U.S. Army, Heineken Experience, Autostadt, Vinopolis, American Girl Place, and others–to show fresh approaches to scripting and staging compelling experiences, while staying true to the very real economic conditions of the day.


Ask the Pilot
by Patrick Smith

Salon.com’s most popular columnist tells why airline travel is still the safest way to get from here to there-and lots of other flight facts.
Even frequent fliers, probably don’t have a clue how their plane gets from New York to Los Angeles in 5 hours. And many people probably think flying is more dangerous now than ever-even though it’s still the safest means of transportation.
In Ask the Pilot, Patrick Smith-a commercial airline pilot and author of Salon.com’s popular column-explains in frank and very funny language what fears are grounded in reality and which ones are airborne urban myths. He stacks up the facts, anecdotes, and advice to every flying question imaginable: * Just how safe it is to fly?
* What is the safest airline?
* Do airlines reduce cabin oxygen flow to save fuel and keep passengers docile?
* Can turbulence cause a crash?
* What’s windshear – and can it really rip the wings off a plane?
* How does a plane get off the ground?
* Why does the plane sometimes bump, jig, and turn at a high angle during climbout?
* Has anyone ever survived a water landing by donning a vest or using a raft?
* Why are tray tables stowed before landing?
Frequent flier or neurotic aerophobe, this is the one book that will wise people up – and calm fliers down.

The Darwin Economy
by Robert H. Frank

Who was the greater economist–Adam Smith or Charles Darwin? The question seems absurd. Darwin, after all, was a naturalist, not an economist. But Robert Frank, New York Times economics columnist and best-selling author of The Economic Naturalist, predicts that within the next century Darwin will unseat Smith as the intellectual founder of economics. The reason, Frank argues, is that Darwin’s understanding of competition describes economic reality far more accurately than Smith’s. And the consequences of this fact are profound. Indeed, the failure to recognize that we live in Darwin’s world rather than Smith’s is putting us all at risk by preventing us from seeing that competition alone will not solve our problems.

Smith’s theory of the invisible hand, which says that competition channels self-interest for the common good, is probably the most widely cited argument today in favor of unbridled competition–and against regulation, taxation, and even government itself. But what if Smith’s idea was almost an exception to the general rule of competition? That’s what Frank argues, resting his case on Darwin’s insight that individual and group interests often diverge sharply. Far from creating a perfect world, economic competition often leads to “arms races,” encouraging behaviors that not only cause enormous harm to the group but also provide no lasting advantages for individuals, since any gains tend to be relative and mutually offsetting.

The good news is that we have the ability to tame the Darwin economy. The best solution is not to prohibit harmful behaviors but to tax them. By doing so, we could make the economic pie larger, eliminate government debt, and provide better public services, all without requiring painful sacrifices from anyone. That’s a bold claim, Frank concedes, but it follows directly from logic and evidence that most people already accept.

In a new afterword, Frank further explores how the themes of inequality and competition are driving today’s public debate on how much government we need.


Flight Attendant Memoir
by Margo D. Anderson

An intriguing, uncensored, inside view of the not-so-friendly skies through the eyes of former flight attendant, Margo Anderson. If you are a frequent flier, or if you plan to fly in the near future, fasten your seat belt for a turbulent read! After five years of flying with a commuter airline based at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, Anderson draws on her personal experiences and conversations, painting a portrayal of life as a flight attendant–grueling twelve hour days, complaining and unfriendly passengers, and unexpected, almost unbelievable situations, especially in the days and weeks following 9/11. Anderson navigates the complex world of flight crews with clarity, insight, wittiness, and her own special brand of humor. Readers are given a view of flying they may never have seen before, through the lens of the workhorse of the airline industry, regarded by many as the “puddle-jumpers,” the commuter airlines.

The Sky Is Not Falling
by John Martin Mcdonald

In 1985, John Martin McDonald was unemployed, on food stamps, married and with a small child. His career took a fateful turn after landing a flight crew job with Trans World Airlines in St. Louis. He was the widely quoted spokesman when Flight 800 blew up, killing 230 people off the coast of New York. In a career in and out of airline PR, he managed media relations surrounding the hostage repatriation of oil pipeline employees, worked on two visits of Pope John Paul II to the United States and coordinated communications during several Fortune 500 bankruptcies. The Sky Is Not Falling puts you in the front seat of a wild drive through Corporate Communications, 35-years of marriage, and decades of substance abuse and recovery. If you want to see a behind-the-scenes PR life at high speed, you will enjoy The Sky Is Not Falling. Onward!

Coming Apart
by Charles Murray

From the bestselling author of Losing Ground and The Bell Curve, this startling long-lens view shows how America is coming apart at the seams that historically have joined our classes.

In Coming Apart, Charles Murray explores the formation of American classes that are different in kind from anything we have ever known, focusing on whites as a way of driving home the fact that the trends he describes do not break along lines of race or ethnicity.

Drawing on five decades of statistics and research, Coming Apart demonstrates that a new upper class and a new lower class have diverged so far in core behaviors and values that they barely recognize their underlying American kinship—divergence that has nothing to do with income inequality and that has grown during good economic times and bad.

The top and bottom of white America increasingly live in different cultures, Murray argues, with the powerful upper class living in enclaves surrounded by their own kind, ignorant about life in mainstream America, and the lower class suffering from erosions of family and community life that strike at the heart of the pursuit of happiness. That divergence puts the success of the American project at risk.

The evidence in Coming Apart is about white America. Its message is about all of America.



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