Book Innovation Economy

Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy
by William H. Janeway

The innovation economy begins with discovery and culminates in speculation. Over some 250 years, economic growth has been driven by successive processes of trial and error: upstream exercises in research and invention and downstream experiments in exploiting the new economic space opened by innovation. Drawing on his professional experiences, William H. Janeway provides an accessible pathway for readers to appreciate the dynamics of the innovation economy. He combines personal reflections from a career spanning forty years in venture capital, with the development of an original theory of the role of asset bubbles in financing technological innovation and of the role of the state in playing an enabling role in the innovation process. Today, with the state frozen as an economic actor and access to the public equity markets only open to a minority, the innovation economy is stalled; learning the lessons from this book will contribute to its renewal.

Innovation Economics
by Robert D. Atkinson, Stephen J. Ezell

This important book delivers a critical wake-up call: a fierce global race for innovation advantage is under way, and while other nations are making support for technology and innovation a central tenet of their economic strategies and policies, America lacks a robust innovation policy. What does this portend? Robert Atkinson and Stephen Ezell, widely respected economic thinkers, report on profound new forces that are shaping the global economy—forces that favor nations with innovation-based economies and innovation policies. Unless the United States enacts public policies to reflect this reality, Americans face the relatively lower standards of living associated with a noncompetitive national economy.

The authors explore how a weak innovation economy not only contributed to the Great Recession but is delaying America’s recovery from it and how innovation in the United States compares with that in other developed and developing nations. Atkinson and Ezell then lay out a detailed, pragmatic road map for America to regain its global innovation advantage by 2020, as well as maximize the global supply of innovation and promote sustainable globalization.


Production in the Innovation Economy
by Richard M. Locke, Rachel L. Wellhausen

Reports from an ambitious MIT research project that makes the case for encouraging the colocation of manufacturing and innovation.

Production in the Innovation Economy emerges from several years of interdisciplinary research at MIT on the links between manufacturing and innovation in the United States and the world economy. Authors from political science, economics, business, employment and operations research, aeronautics and astronautics, and nuclear engineering come together to explore the extent to which manufacturing is key to an innovative and vibrant economy.

Chapters include survey research on gaps in worker skill development and training; discussions of coproduction with Chinese firms and participation in complex manufacturing projects in China; analyses of constraints facing American start-up firms involved in manufacturing; proposals for a future of distributed manufacturing and a focus on product variety as a marker of innovation; and forecasts of powerful advanced manufacturing technologies on the horizon. The chapters show that although the global distribution of manufacturing is not an automatic loss for the United States, gains from the colocation of manufacturing and innovation have not disappeared. The book emphasizes public policy that encourages colocation through, for example, training programs, supplements to private capital, and interfirm cooperation in industry consortia. Such approaches can help the United States not only to maintain manufacturing capacity but also, crucially, to maximize its innovative potential.

Contributors
Joyce Lawrence, Richard K. Lester, Richard M. Locke, Florian Metzler, Jonas Nahm, Paul Osterman, Elisabeth B. Reynolds, Donald B. Rosenfeld, Hiram M. Samel, Sanjay E. Sarma, Edward S. Steinfeld, Andrew Weaver, Rachel L. Wellhausen, Olivier de Weck


Strategic Management in the Innovation Economy
by Thomas H. Davenport, Marius Leibold, Sven C. Voelpel

Innovative ruptures of traditional boundaries in value chains are requiring companies to rethink how they go to market, what they need to own, what they need to retain and innovate as core competencies, and how they innovatively deal with suppliers and customers.

The key message of the book is that the new knowledge-networked innovation economy requires a totally different strategic management mindset, approach and toolbox, and its major value-added is a new strategic management approach and toolbox for the innovation economy – a poised strategy approach. Designed for both managers and advanced business students, the book provides a unique combination of new management theory, selected managerial articles by prominent scholars such as Clayton Christensen, Henry Chesbrough, Sumantra Ghoshal, Quinn Mills, and Peter Senge, and a wide array of real-world case examples including GE, Shell, IBM, HP, BRL Hardy, P&G, Southwest Airlines and McGraw-Hill, within the dynamics of industries such as airlines, energy, telecommunications, wine & beverages, and computing. The authors illustrate powerful new strategic innovation concepts and tools, such as poised strategy for managing multiple business models, poised strategy scorecards (moving beyond the well-known balanced scorecard), the wheel of business model reinvention, and organizational rejuvenation methods.

The book includes the concepts of: Poised Strategic Management, Organizational Rejuvenation, Business Models as Platform for Strategy, Poised Scorecards, Identifying Sources of Innovation in Business Ecosystems.


Invention and Reinvention
by Mary Lindenstein Walshok, Abraham J. Shragge

Formerly prosperous cities across the United States, struggling to keep up with an increasingly global economy and the continued decline of post-war industries like manufacturing, face the issue of how to adapt to today’s knowledge economy. In Invention and Reinvention, authors Mary Walshok and Abraham Shragge chronicle San Diego’s transformation from a small West Coast settlement to a booming military metropolis and then to a successful innovation hub. This instructive story of a second-tier city that transformed its core economic identity can serve as a rich case and a model for similar regions. Stressing the role that cultural values and social dynamics played in its transition, the authors discern five distinct, recurring factors upon which San Diego capitalized at key junctures in its economic growth. San Diego—though not always a star city—has been able to repurpose its assets and realign its economic development strategies continuously in order to sustain prosperity. Chronicling over a century of adaptation, this book offers a lively and penetrating tale of how one city reinvented itself to meet the demands of today’s economy, lighting the way for others.

Innovation, Economic Development and Policy
by Jan Fagerberg

 This authoritative and enlightening book focuses on fundamental questions such as what is innovation, who is it relevant for, what are the effects, and what is the role of (innovation) policy in supporting innovation-diffusion? The first two sections present a comprehensive overview of our current knowledge on the phenomenon and analyse how this knowledge (and the scholarly community underpinning it) has evolved towards its present state. The third part explores the role of innovation for growth and development, while section four is concerned with the national innovation system and the role of (innovation) policy in influencing its dynamics and responding to the important challenges facing contemporary societies.


Globalization, Growth, and Governance : Towards an Innovative Economy
by Jonathan Michie, John Grieve Smith

This book is about the processes of innovation at the global, national, and corporate levels. It explores the contexts, complexities, and contradictions of innovation from a range of disciplinary perspectives and is divided into three main sections: Globalization and Technology; Innovation and Growth; Governance, Business Performance, and Public Policy. Interdisciplinary and international in its scope this book provides important evidence and arguments on the processes of innovation, and in so doing addresses real challenges for policy-makers, managers, and academics alike. – ;This book is about the processes of innovation at the global, national, and corporate levels. It explores the contexts, complexities, and contradictions of innovation from a range of disciplinary perspectives and is divided into three main sections. In the first on Globalization and Technology, international contributors explore the links between changing systems of production and competitiveness; the impact of new technology and innovation on international labour markets; and the innovation practices of global firms. In the section on Innovation and Growth, a close look is taken at the innovation decisions and activities of individual firms. The evidence in these chapters challenges many assumptions about the nature of competitive behaviour and the co-operative links between firms. In the section on Governance, Business Performance, and Public Policy, the contributors examine the relationship between governance systems and firms’ innovation strategies and decisions, assessing the capabilities and characteristics of different models of capitalism. The book concludes with a discussion of the most effective approach to industrial policy in the ‘innovative economy’. Interdisciplinary and international in its scope this book provides important evidence and arguments on the processes of innovation and in so doing addresses real challenges for policy-makers, managers, and academics alike. –

Hammer and Silicon
by Sheila M. Puffer, Daniel J. McCarthy, Daniel M. Satinsky

This deeply personal book tells the untold story of the significant contributions of technical professionals from the former Soviet Union to the US innovation economy, particularly in the sectors of software, social media, biotechnology, and medicine. Drawing upon in-depth interviews, it channels the voices and stories of more than 150 professionals who emigrated from 11 of the 15 former Soviet republics between the 1970s and 2015, and who currently work in the innovation hubs of Silicon Valley and Boston/Cambridge. Using the social science theories of institutions, imprinting, and identity, the authors analyze the political, social, economic, and educational forces that have characterized Soviet immigration over the past 40 years, showing how the particularities of the Soviet context may have benefited or challenged interviewees’ work and social lives. The resulting mosaic of perspectives provides valuable insight into the impact of immigration on US economic development, specifically in high technology and innovation.

Leadership and Organization in the Innovation Economy
by Jon-Arild Johannessen

Since the 1980s, society has undergone enormous change. From an industrialized society, focused on efficiency and productivity, there has been a transformation to a globalized knowledge society that focuses on creativity and innovation. And yet, management styles have stayed the same, not adapting to this crucial change. Here, leading innovation expert Jon-Arild Johannessen offers a replacement to traditional goal-driven management and New Public Management (NPM). These old styles of management promote efficiency and productivity, but hamper creativity and innovation. To counteract this, Johannessen suggests and outlines a new concept: strategic innovation management. Through a thorough analysis and debate of the demands of the new leadership role, and the demands of both employees and organizations, Johannessen explores the place of this new management style in the 21st century. For students and researchers of knowledge management, leadership, or innovation, this is an unmissable book exploring a fascinating new proposal.

Creating Regional Wealth in the Innovation Economy
by Jeff Saperstein, Daniel Rouach

Drawing on extensive new research through dozens of interviews with entrepreneurial champions in diverse sectors, Creating Regional Wealth in the Global Innovation Economy pinpoints the key reasons why some locations succeed in the quest to become centers of technology and innovation – and sustain their competitive advantages over time – while others fail. It answers the central questions about the world’s entrepreneurial hotspots: What makes these locations special? How can local business and government organizations most effectively promote local entrepreneurship? And what can budding centers of entrepreneurship do in order to enter the game?



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