Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker’s Notes for Dracula
by Bram Stoker, Robert Eighteen-Bisang, Elizabeth Miller

Bram Stoker’s initial notes and outlines for his landmark horror novel Dracula were auctioned at Sotheby’s in London in 1913 and eventually made their way to the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia, where they are housed today. Until now, few of the 124 pages have been transcribed or analyzed. This painstaking work reproduces the handwritten notes both in facsimile and in annotated transcription. It also includes Stoker’s typewritten research notes and thoroughly analyzes all of the materials, which range from Stoker’s thoughts on the novel’s characters and settings to a nine-page calendar of events that includes most of the now-familiar story. Ample annotations guide readers through the construction of the novel and the changes that were made to its structure, plot, setting and characters. Nine appendices provide insight into Stoker’s personal life, his other works and his early literary influences.

Dracula
by Stephanie Spinner

Of the many admiring reviews Bram Stoker’s Dracula received when it first appeared in 1897, the most astute praise came from the author’s mother, who wrote her son: “It is splendid. No book since Mrs. Shelley’s Frankenstein or indeed any other at all has come near yours in originality, or terror.”

A popular bestseller in Victorian England, Stoker’s hypnotic tale of the bloodthirsty Count Dracula, whose nocturnal atrocities are symbolic of an evil ages old yet forever new, endures as the quintessential story of suspense and horror. The unbridled lusts and desires, the diabolical cravings that Stoker dramatized with such mythical force, render Dracula resonant and unsettling a century later.

From the Hardcover edition.


Bram Stoker
by Nancy Whitelaw

A biography of the theatrical manager and prolific author who, among other achievements, completed the novel “Dracula” in 1897.

Bram Stoker And The Man Who Was Dracula
by Barbara Belford

“What a splendid subject to sink one’s teeth into,” raved the Washington Post. Here was a six-foot-two Irishman with a red beard—a Victorian family man, a spirited debater, and the author of novels and short stories largely forgotten today. All, of course, except for Dracula, which has enjoyed countless stage and screen incarnations and haunted the dreams of many generations. Bram Stoker lived at the very center of late-Victorian social and artistic life and numbered among his friends Oscar Wilde, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, James Whistler, William Gladstone, and Alfred Lord Tennyson. But it was his relationship with the mesmerizing, domineering actor Henry Irving that may have played the most crucial role in Stoker’s life—a real-life monster who ultimately led to Stoker’s most famous creation. In this book that the Baltimore Sun called “superb,” Barbara Belford draws on unpublished archival material to reveal the links between the reticent author’s life, his vampire tale, and the political, occult, cultural, and sexual background of the 1890s.

Dracula
by Bram Stoker

When solicitor’s clerk Jonathan Harker travels to Transylvania on business to meet a mysterious Romanian count named Dracula, he little expects the horrors this strange meeting will unleash. Thus Bram Stoker’s 1897 novel of blood and passion begins, rapidly accelerating from Harker’s nightmarish experiences in Castle Dracula to a full-fledged vampiric assault on late-Victorian London itself. The story, narrated through a collection of documents-primarily journal entries and letters-chronicles the desperate efforts of a band of gentlemen to protect the virtue of their ladies and lay to rest the ancient threat once and for all.

Often vacillating wildly between the terrible and the comic, Dracula at the same time brings to life a host of compelling themes: tensions between antiquity and modernity; the powers and limitations of technology; the critical importance of feminine virtue; the difference between superstition and religion; the nature of evil; and, perhaps most compellingly, the complex relationship between ancient faith and scientific enlightenment. More vivid than any of its varied film adaptations, and over a century after its first publication, Dracula still retains its sharp bite.


Bram Stoker – Dracula
by William Hughes

This comprehensive survey of the critical response to Dracula provides an overview of the trends and development of work surrounding the novel. The critics and approaches discussed range from the earliest studies to the present day, with particular emphasis on biography, psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, Irish studies and gender.

Dracula
by Bram Stoker

A naive young Englishman travels to Transylvania to do business with a client, Count Dracula. After showing his true and terrifying colors, Dracula boards a ship for England in search of new, fresh blood. Unexplained disasters begin to occur in the streets of London before the mystery and the evil doer are finally put to rest. Told in a series of news reports from eyewitness observers to writers of personal diaries, this has a ring of believability.

Bram Stoker’s Dracula
by Carol Margaret Davison

Winner of the 1997 International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts Best Non-fiction Book

In 1897, Archibald Constable & Company published a novel by the unheralded Bram Stoker. That novel, Dracula, has gone on to become perhaps the most influential novel of all time. To commemorate the centennial of that great novel, Carol Margaret Davison has brought together this collection of essays by some of the world’s leading scholars. The essays analyze Stoker’s original novel and celebrate its legacy in popular culture. The continuing presence of Dracula and vampire fiction and films provides proof that, as Davison writes, Dracula is “alive and sucking.”

“Dracula is a Gothic mandala, a vast design in which multiple reflections of the elements of the genre are configured in elegant sets of symmetries. It is also a sort of lens, bringing focus and compression to diverse Gothic motifs, including not only vampirism but madness, the night, spoiled innocence, disorder in nature, sacrilege, cannibalism, necrophilia, psychic projection, the succubus, the incubus, the ruin, and the tomb. Gathering up and unifying all that came before it, and casting its great shadow over all that came and continues to come after, its influence on twentieth-century Gothic fiction and film is unique and irresistible.”

from the Preface by Patrick McGrath



About apujb86