Food

Food
by Paul Freedman, Professor Paul Freedman

This richly illustrated book is the first to apply the discoveries of the new generation of food historians to the pleasures of dining and the culinary accomplishments of diverse civilizations, past and present. Editor Paul Freedman has gathered essays by French, German, Belgian, American, and British historians to present a comprehensive, chronological history of taste from prehistory to the present day. The authors explore the early repertoire of sweet tastes; the distinctive contributions made by classical antiquity and China; the subtle, sophisticated, and varied group of food customs created by the Islamic civilizations of Iberia, the Arabian desert, Persia, and Byzantium; the magnificent cuisine of the Middle Ages, influenced by Rome and adapted from Islamic Spain, Africa, and the Middle East; the decisive break with highly spiced food traditions after the Renaissance and the new focus on primary ingredients and products from the New World; French cuisine’s rise to dominance in Europe and America; the evolution of modern restaurant dining, modern agriculture, and technological developments; and today’s tastes, which employ few rules and exhibit a glorious eclecticism. The result is the enthralling story not only of what sustains us but also of what makes us feel alive.

Copub: Thames & Hudson


Food
by

Discusses foods people eat, the food chain, and how we can eat proper diets.

Food
by Jean-Louis Flandrin, Massimo Montanari

When did we first serve meals at regular hours? Why did we begin using individual plates and utensils to eat? When did “cuisine” become a concept and how did we come to judge food by its method of preparation, manner of consumption, and gastronomic merit?

Food: A Culinary History explores culinary evolution and eating habits from prehistoric times to the present, offering surprising insights into our social and agricultural practices, religious beliefs, and most unreflected habits. The volume dispels myths such as the tale that Marco Polo brought pasta to Europe from China, that the original recipe for chocolate contained chili instead of sugar, and more. As it builds its history, the text also reveals the dietary rules of the ancient Hebrews, the contributions of Arabic cookery to European cuisine, the table etiquette of the Middle Ages, and the evolution of beverage styles in early America. It concludes with a discussion on the McDonaldization of food and growing popularity of foreign foods today.


Food
by Mark Hyman

#1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat.

Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn’t a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn’t build bones, and eggs aren’t the devil?

Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose weight, stay fit, and improve our health. And who can blame us? When it comes to diet, there’s so much changing and conflicting information flying around that it’s impossible to know where to look for sound advice. And decades of misguided “common sense,” food-industry lobbying, bad science, and corrupt food polices and guidelines have only deepened our crisis of nutritional confusion, leaving us overwhelmed and anxious when we head to the grocery store.

Thankfully, bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman is here to set the record straight. In Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? — his most comprehensive book yet — he takes a close look at every food group and explains what we’ve gotten wrong, revealing which foods nurture our health and which pose a threat. From grains to legumes, meat to dairy, fats to artificial sweeteners, and beyond, Dr. Hyman debunks misconceptions and breaks down the fascinating science in his signature accessible style. He also explains food’s role as powerful medicine capable of reversing chronic disease and shows how our food system and policies impact the environment, the economy, social justice, and personal health, painting a holistic picture of growing, cooking, and eating food in ways that nourish our bodies and the earth while creating a healthy society.

With myth-busting insights, easy-to-understand science, and delicious, wholesome recipes, Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? is a no-nonsense guide to achieving optimal weight and lifelong health.


Food
by Alexandra Fix

Read ‘Food’ to discover how food gets from a farm to the grocery store. Learn how food waste can be recycled, the benefits of buying food that is grown locally, and how to reduce your own food waste.


Enzymes in Food Technology
by Robert J. Whitehurst, Maarten Van Oort

The second edition of this successful book highlights the widespread use of enzymes in food processing improvement and innovation, explaining how they bring advantages. The properties of different enzymes are linked to the physical and biochemical events that they influence in food materials and products, while these in turn are related to the key organoleptic, sensory and shelf life qualities of foods.

Fully updated to reflect advances made in the field over recent years, new chapters in the second edition look at the use of enzymes in the reduction of acrylamide, in fish processing and in non-bread cereal applications such as flour confectionery. Genetic modification of source organisms (GMO) has been used to improve yields of purer enzymes for some time now but the newer technology of protein engineering (PE) of enzymes has the potential to produce purer, more targeted products without unwanted side activities, and a chapter is also included on this important new topic. Authors have been selected not only for their practical working knowledge of enzymes but also for their infectious enthusiasm for the subject.

The book is aimed at food scientists and technologists, ingredients suppliers, geneticists, analytical chemists and quality assurance personnel.


On Food and Cooking
by Harold McGee

Harold McGee’s On Food and Cooking is a kitchen classic. Hailed by Time magazine as “a minor masterpiece” when it first appeared in 1984, On Food and Cooking is the bible to which food lovers and professional chefs worldwide turn for an understanding of where our foods come from, what exactly they’re made of, and how cooking transforms them into something new and delicious.
Now, for its twentieth anniversary, Harold McGee has prepared a new, fully revised and updated edition of On Food and Cooking. He has rewritten the text almost completely, expanded it by two-thirds, and commissioned more than 100 new illustrations. As compulsively readable and engaging as ever, the new On Food and Cooking provides countless eye-opening insights into food, its preparation, and its enjoyment.
On Food and Cooking pioneered the translation of technical food science into cook-friendly kitchen science and helped give birth to the inventive culinary movement known as “molecular gastronomy.” Though other books have now been written about kitchen science, On Food and Cooking remains unmatched in the accuracy, clarity, and thoroughness of its explanations, and the intriguing way in which it blends science with the historical evolution of foods and cooking techniques.
Among the major themes addressed throughout this new edition are:

  • Traditional and modern methods of food production and their influences on food quality
  • The great diversity of methods by which people in different places and times have prepared the same ingredients
  • Tips for selecting the best ingredients and preparing them successfully
  • The particular substances that give foods their flavors and that give us pleasure
  • Our evolving knowledge of the health benefits and risks of foods

On Food and Cooking is an invaluable and monumental compendium of basic information about ingredients, cooking methods, and the pleasures of eating. It will delight and fascinate anyone who has ever cooked, savored, or wondered about food.


Food and Love
by Jack Goody, John Rankine Goody

Jack Goody is a thinker who enjoys subverting neat simplifications and rigid preconceptions. A leading anthropologist and comparative sociologist, he is perhaps best known for his acclaimed critique of crude historical distinctions between “West” and “East” and overblown claims for the uniqueness of the West. In Food and Love, Goody pursues his argument into the sphere of culture.

The development of romantic love, the evolution of national and regional cuisines, the globalisation of Chinese food, and the histories of various taboos on certain types of food and drink, the uniqueness of the European family—such are the fascinating and diverse themes Goody addresses effortlessly ranging from Europe to Asia and to Africa.

Starting with a sustained discussion of the context of such debates in the thought of classic theorists as well as contemporary historical and sociological notions of modernisation, Goody goes on to use his skill and knowledge as an anthropologist and comparative sociologist to tease out the general historical processes embedded in the most intimate recesses of our lives. In a final bracing section challenging dominant relativist conceptions, Goody considers the difficulties and complexities of cross-cultural and comparative analysis, and he picks apart the doubts involved in the very process or representation and symbolic communication.

Throughout the book, Goody demonstrates that the ethnocentricity of much of Western scholarship has distorted not only the comprehension of the East but also developments in Europe’s past and present. FOOD “The twelfth and thirteenth centuries saw the birth of a ‘courtly’ ideology of food parallel to that of courtly love (fin ‘amor). What one ate became seen as constitutive of the very quality of persons, giving rise to sumptuary legislation which saw to it that people consumed the foods appropriate to their status and not those of higher groups.” AND LOVE “In writing a love poem one is rarely addressing directly the loved object … for the troubadours, courtly love, in retrospect called ‘romantic’, was ‘l’amoor de lonh’, distant love in both a physical and social sense … one quotes rather than invents the discourse of love.”


The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink
by Andrew F. Smith

Offering a panoramic view of the history and culture of food and drink in America with fascinating entries on everything from the smell of asparagus to the history of White Castle, and the origin of Bloody Marys to jambalaya, the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink provides a concise, authoritative, and exuberant look at this modern American obsession. Ideal for the food scholar and food enthusiast alike, it is equally appetizing for anyone fascinated by Americana, capturing our culture and history through what we love most–food!Building on the highly praised and deliciously browseable two-volume compendium the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, this new work serves up everything you could ever want to know about American consumables and their impact on popular culture and the culinary world. Within its pages for example, we learn that Lifesavers candy owes its success to the canny marketing idea of placing the original flavor, mint, next to cash registers at bars. Patrons who bought them to mask the smell of alcohol on their breath before heading home soon found they were just as tasty sober and the company began producing other flavors.Edited by Andrew Smith, a writer and lecturer on culinary history, the Companion serves up more than just trivia however, including hundreds of entries on fast food, celebrity chefs, fish, sandwiches, regional and ethnic cuisine, food science, and historical food traditions. It also dispels a few commonly held myths. Veganism, isn’t simply the practice of a few “hippies,” but is in fact wide-spread among elite athletic circles. Many of the top competitors in the Ironman and Ultramarathon events go even further, avoiding all animal products by following a strictly vegan diet. Anyone hungering to know what our nation has been cooking and eating for the last three centuries should own the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink.
DT Nearly 1,000 articles on American food and drink, from the curious to the commonplace
DT Beautifully illustrated with hundreds of historical photographs and color images
DT Includes informative lists of food websites, museums, organizations, and festivals


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