Givenchy

Vogue on Hubert de Givenchy
by Drusilla Beyfus

The fashion aesthetic of handsome, aristocratic Hubert de Givenchy combined the traditions of haute couture—creative, luxurious, and perfectionist—with a modern entrepreneurial sensibility. In a career spanning 40 years, he created the most glamorous of evening dresses, developed the influential “sack” dress, and produced debonair daytime suits that have never gone out of fashion. He also famously defined the sartorial image of Audrey Hepburn—both onscreen and off—designing the little black dress for Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Created by the editors of British Vogue, Vogue on Hubert de Givenchy features biography and history studded with more than 80 images from their unique archive of images taken by leading photographers such as Irving Penn, Patrick Demarchelier, and Cecil Beaton.

The Givenchy Code
by Julie Kenner

A mind-bending code spawned from the mind of a madman… or maybe just a jealous ex. A desperate race through the cathedrals and hotels of New York City… with a teeny bit of time for shopping, it’s true. An astonishing truth concealed for years, unveiled at last… with more than a little help from a supercute new guy. As if a recent breakup, scrounging for rent money, and lusting after designer shoes weren’t enough to make graduate student Melanie Prescott’s life challenging, suddenly she’s practically living The Da Vinci Code. A mysterious stranger is sending obscure codes and clues her way and she soon discovers she has to solve them in order to stay alive. With stakes like that, her dissertation on ‘the derivation and primary characteristics of codes and ciphers used by prevailing nations during wartime’ is looking a little less important than it was yesterday. Right now she’s just worrying about living to see tomorrow. The only bright spot in the whole freakish nightmare is Matthew Stryker, the six-foot tall, dark, and handsome stranger who’s determined to protect her. Well, that and the millions of dollars that will be her reward if she survives this deadly game. And she’d better survive. Because that’s a heck of a lot of money to be able to spend on shoes and handbags and sunglasses and dresses, and, well, it’s hard to be fashionable when you’re dead.

Givenchy Paper Dolls
by Tom Tierney

Hubert de Givenchy designed exclusive fashions for a clientele that included princesses, heiresses, and movie stars. Audrey Hepburn, Givenchy’s most ardent patron, sported his haute couture creations both off screen and on. These three paper dolls model 30 of the designer’s elegant dresses, suits, gowns, and other garments from the 1950s–80s. Famous movie costumes include the "little black dresses" from Sabrina and Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

Audrey and Givenchy
by Cindy De La Hoz

Audrey and Givenchy is a stunning showcase of the most influential teaming of star and designer in fashion history: Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy.


Legendary screen star Aubrey Hepburn and designer Hubert de Givenchy were a brilliant meeting of fashion-forward minds. Over the course of their forty-year friendship and professional partnership, both became fashion icons whose collaborations influenced trends for generations to come — the words “Audrey style” still conjure images of ballet flats, little black dresses, bateau necklines, capri pants, and countless stunning fashions.


With gorgeous photography throughout, Audrey and Givenchy is a celebration of the duo’s collaborations both onscreen and off, featuring fashion profiles on such classic films as Sabrina, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Charade, How to Steal a Million, and Funny Face, as well as their greatest off-screen fashion hits for awards shows and events.



Givenchy in the Great War
by Phil Tomaselli

The village of Givenchy-lès-la-Bassée sits on a small rise in the Pas de Calais Department in northern France. One hundred years ago it was overtaken by the First World War. The fighting there was intense – eleven Victoria Crosses were won in this tiny locality between 1914 and 1918. Phil Tomaselli’s in-depth account shows what happened at Givenchy when it became a battlefield, and the story here was repeated in the other villages and towns on the Western Front. Givenchy’s key position made it the target for crushing bombardments, infantry assaults and subterranean warfare. The landscape was pulverized by shellfire, the ground beneath was honeycombed with tunnels. Mining operations, shelling, sniping and trench raids took place around the remains of the village even when this stretch of the front line was relatively quiet. The grueling struggle of attrition that characterized the fighting on the Western Front continued here throughout the war. Phil Tomaselli’s gripping narrative makes extensive use of war diary extracts, personal stories, official and unofficial histories.

For Audrey With Love
by Philip Hopman

When two young rising stars—Hubert de Givenchy and Audrey Hepburn—cross paths for the first time—it’s magic . . . literally, the perfect fit!

All the famous ladies want a Givenchy dress—actresses, opera singers, princesses and the wife of a president. When Audrey Hepburn has to figure what to wear for her next movie, she approaches Givenchy, but he’s too busy to design something just for her. When encourages her to try on clothing from within his collection, they’re both stunned by what they discover.

Philip Hopman brings us a stylish and compelling picture book about fashion and friendship that fits like a glove!


Hubert de Givenchy
by

Published on the occasion of the first major retrospective of the work of the great French fashion designer, this volume celebrates a key twentieth-century creator and a living legend in the history of haute couture. The exhibition, devised by Hubert de Givenchy himself and curated by Eloy Martínez de la Pera, provides an exceptional survey of the couturier’s creations over nearly half a century, from the opening of the Maison Givenchy in Paris in 1952 to his professional retirement in 1995. A hundred or so of his finest pieces selected from museums and private collections all over the world, many of them never previously shown, establish a dialogue in the Museum’s galleries with a group of works belonging to the Thyssen-Bornemisza collections.
Hubert de Givenchy(born 1927) was born to an aristocratic family in Beauvais, France. After completing his studies at the École des Beaux-Arts, Givenchy worked for several fashion designers, including the avant-garde Elsa Schiaparelli. In 1952 he opened his own fashion house, his style markedly innovative compared to the conservatism of his contemporaries. He was, at age 25, the youngest couturier of the Parisian fashion scene. Thanks to his elegant, feminine designs, the Givenchy brand soon became synonymous with Parisian chic, and the designer is known for dressing celebrity icons such as Jacqueline Kennedy, Audrey Hepburn and Grace Kelly.

The Influence of Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy on American Fashion, 1952-1965
by Kate Elizabeth Smith

This thesis investigated the influence of Audrey Hepburn and her collaboration with Hubert de Givenchy on fashionable dress between 1952-1965. A content analysis of high fashion, general women’s periodicals and one clothing catalog was conducted using selected styles/garments featured in popular Audrey Hepburn movies to see if these styles emerged just after the movies were released.


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