Age Of Discontuinity

The Age of Discontinuity
by Peter F. Drucker

The closing decades of the twentieth century have been characterized as a period of disruption and discontinuity in which the structure and meaning of economy, polity, and society have been radically altered. In this volume Peter Drucker focuses with great clarity and perception on the forces of change that are transforming the economic landscape and creating tomorrow’s society. Drucker discerns four major areas of discontinuity underlying contemporary social and cultural reality. These are: (1) the explosion of new technologies resulting in major new industries; (2) the change from an international to a world economy—an economy that presently lacks policy, theory, and institutions; (3) a new sociopolitical reality of pluralistic institutions that poses drastic political, philosophical, and spritual challenges; and (4) the new universe of knowledge based on mass education and its implications in work, leisure, and leadership. Peter Drucker brings to this work an intimate knowledge and objective view of the particular and general. The Age of Discontinuity is a fascinating and important blueprint for shaping a future already very much with us.

The Age of Discontinuity
by Peter Drucker

The closing decades of the twentieth century have been characterized as a period of disruption and discontinuity in which the structure and meaning of economy, polity, and society have been radically altered. In this volume Peter Drucker focuses with great clarity and perception on the forces of change that are transforming the economic landscape and creating tomorrow’s society.

Drucker discerns four major areas of discontinuity underlying contemporary social and cultural reality. These are: (1) the explosion of new technologies resulting in major new industries; (2) the change from an international to a world economy—an economy that presently lacks policy, theory, and institutions; (3) a new sociopolitical reality of pluralistic institutions that poses drastic political, philosophical, and spritual challenges; and (4) the new universe of knowledge based on mass education and its implications in work, leisure, and leadership.

Peter Drucker brings to this work an intimate knowledge and objective view of the particular and general. The Age of Discontinuity is a fascinating and important blueprint for shaping a future already very much with us.


Continuity in Children’s Worlds
by Melissa M. Jozwiak, Betsy J. Cahill, Rachel Theilheimer

“Offers hope through its rich and abundant examples of teachers, parents, and others who care for young children mindfully taking the time to address issues of continuity in everyday life.”
—From the Foreword by Beth Blue Swadener, Arizona State University

“After reading this book, it is not possible to think about these ideas simplistically again.”
—Virginia Casper, Bank Street College of Education

“This examination gives voice to an important but often unexamined issue in early childhood education.”
—Christopher P. Brown, The University of Texas at Austin

Children’s experiences when they transition from home to school, from classroom to classroom, and from school to school raise issues of continuity that permeate every aspect of early childhood education. This book uses practitioner stories to investigate beliefs about continuity and discontinuity and how these beliefs are enacted in contexts for young children from birth to age 8. The authors examine a range of continuities and discontinuities, including the experiences children, teachers, and families have with programs; the interactions between families and schools; and the ways in which programs and schools relate to one another. They also raise questions about primary caregiving, cultural responsiveness, assessment practices, and congruity between institutions. Discussions of each story include the authors’ interpretations, references to relevant theory, questions for reflection, and implications for intentional and thoughtful practice.

Book Features:

Represents the first comprehensive volume to unpack the complex topic of continuity. Provides a critical analysis of continuity based on real stories from practitioners and parents. Illuminates the work of early childhood educators on the individual, group, organizational, and systems levels. Encourages readers to carefully consider their roles as educators of young children.


The Long Seventh Century
by Alessandro Gnasso, Emanuele Ettore Intagliata, Thomas J. MacMaster, Bethan N. Morris

This volume represents a selection of papers presented at the 2013 Edinburgh Seventh Century Colloquium, showcasing the latest scholarship from a rising generation of academics. The volume traverses the globe from Iran to the Atlantic and from Sweden to the Sahara and ranges from the establishment of the early Islamic state to the beginnings of English Christianity. Topics include the transmission of high culture across time, settlement patterns in a rapidly changing world and the formation of new and emerging identities. The essays also bring into dialogue a wide range of disciplinary and methodological perspectives, including archaeology, literature, history, art, papyrology and economics. Together, they generate valuable new insights into the still uncharted territories of the long seventh century.

Youth and History
by John R. Gillis

Youth and History: Tradition and Change in European Age Relations 1770 – Present, Expanded Student Edition deals with the patterns of behavior and styles that characterizes the youth in a particular period of time.
Chapters in the book discuss such topics as the description of youth in preindustrial Europe; the emergence of separate working class and middle class traditions of youth and the conflict between these traditions, as it was institutionalized in the academic and extracurricular cultures of the early twentieth century; and the youth tradition in the volatile 1950s and 1960s.
Psychologists, sociologists, and historians will find the book insightful.

Lost to the State
by Elena Khlinovskaya Rockhill

Childhood held a special place in Soviet society: seen as the key to a better future, children were imagined as the only privileged class. Therefore, the rapid emergence in post-Soviet Russia of the vast numbers of vulnerable ‘social orphans’, or children who have living relatives but grow up in residential care institutions, caught the public by surprise, leading to discussions of the role and place of childhood in the new society. Based on an in-depth study the author explores dissonance between new post-Soviet forms of family and economy, and lingering Soviet attitudes, revealing social orphans as an embodiment of a long-standing power struggle between the state and the family. The author uncovers parallels between (post-) Soviet and Western practices in child welfare and attitudes towards ‘bad’ mothers, and proposes a new way of interpreting kinship where the state is an integral member.


Composing a Further Life
by Mary Catherine Bateson

Mary Catherine Bateson—author of the landmark bestseller Composing a Life—gives us an inspiring exploration of a new life stage that she calls Adulthood II, a result of the longer life spans and greater resources we now enjoy. In Composing a Further Life, Bateson redefines old age as an opportunity to reinvent ourselves and challenges us to use it to pursue new sources of meaning and ways to contribute to society.

Bateson shares the stories of men and women who are flourishing examples of this “age of active wisdom”—from a retired boatyard worker turned silversmith to a famous actress to a former foundation president exploring the crucial role of grandparents in our society. Retiring no longer means withdrawing from life, but engaging with it more deeply, and Composing a Further Life points the way.


Emerging Adults in America
by Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, Jennifer Lynn Tanner

Emerging Adults in America: Coming of Age in the 21st Century portrays the lives of young Americans between adolescence and young adulthood, a distinct developmental stage that editor Jeffrey Jensen Arnett describes as emerging adulthood. Over the past 40 years, the average age of marriage and parenthood has risen dramatically, and the years from the late teens through the mid-20s are no longer dedicated to settling into traditional adult roles. Instead, the focus has shifted to pursuing higher education, self-exploration, and shaping a future that best suits personal goals and desires. Along with coeditor Jennifer Lynn Tanner, Arnett has compiled a collection of chapters in this groundbreaking work that cover a range of topics from relationships with parents to views about love, sex, and marriage; from experiences in college to those in the work place; and from religious beliefs to beliefs about the concept of adulthood. This insightful book will be a valuable resource for developmental psychologists, therapists, and mental health practitioners who work with emerging adults and will appeal to young people and their families.

Continuity and Discontinuity
by S. Lewis Johnson, John S. Feinberg

The resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead is proof that He has conquered death and has thrown open the door of everlasting life.

Because of Christ’s death on the Cross, we can know the joy of God’s forgiveness for our sins. And through His resurrection we can have the assurance of everlasting life. The living Savior promises: “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:25).

After the dark hours on the Cross when Christ was judged by God for our sins, His body was placed in a new tomb. His enemies set up a guard and sealed the tomb with a Roman seal so that His body would not be stolen.

Three days later, on resurrection morning, an angel declared the triumphant news to His followers: “I know that ye seek Jesus, which was crucified. He is not here: for He is risen” (Matthew 28:5).

Jesus Christ arose from the dead! The Savior who was “made sin for us that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him” was accepted by His Heavenly Father. The “Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world” had fulfilled the work of God for our redemption.

Because of Christ’s resurrection you can receive God’s salvation: “If thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised Him from the dead, thou shalt be saved” (Romans 10:9).

You can be assured that Jesus Christ is living for you. The living Savior “is able to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by Him, seeing He ever liveth” (Hebrews 7:25).

Because Jesus Christ lives in Heaven today, those who trust Him for salvation will one day be with Him. He promises: “I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in Me, though he were dead, yet shall he live” (John 11:25).



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