Devil’s Advocate

The X-Files Origins: Devil’s Advocate
by Jonathan Maberry

How did Dana Scully become a skeptic?

Read this dark thriller to find out why millions of people became obsessed with The X-Files.

In the spring of 1979, fifteen-year-old Dana Scully has bigger problems than being the new girl in school. Dana has always had dreams. Sometimes they’ve even come true. Until now, she tried to write this off as coincidence. But ever since her father’s military career moved the family across the country to Craiger, Maryland, the dreams have been more like visions. Vivid, disturbing, and haunted by a shadowy figure who may be an angel . . . or the devil.

When a classmate who recently died in a car accident appears before Dana, her wounds look anything but accidental. Compelled by a force she can’t name, Dana uncovers even more suspicious deaths—and must face the dangerous knowledge that evil is real.

But when a betrayal of faith makes her question everything, she begins to put her faith in being a skeptic.

An Imprint Book


The Devil’s Advocate
by Andrew Neiderman

When Kevin Taylor joins the Manhattan criminal law firm of John Milton & Associates, he’s hit the big time. At last, he and his wife can enjoy the luxuries they’ve so desired–money, a chauffeur-driven limo, and a stunning home in a high-rise. Then Milton assigns Kevin one of the most notorious cases of the year, with a file that had been put together prior to the crime. Throwing himself into his work, Kevin begins to see a pattern of evil emerging from behind the firm’s plush facade. Acquittal after acquittal, every criminal client walks free, and Kevin’s suspicions slowly give way to terror. For Kevin has just become The Devil’s Advocate.

Devil’s Advocate
by

Yes, that’s right, this fancy hardcover book reproduces tons of Coop’s posters and stickers and thangs, all in colour. While illustrating record covers and ads for Long Gone, John Mermis of Sympathy for the Record Industry, Coop made the acquaintance of the popular poster artist Kozik. Foreword by Robert Williams.

The Devil’s Advocate
by Andrew Neiderman

When Kevin Taylor joins the Manhattan criminal law firm of John Milton & Associates, he’s hit the big time. At last, he and his wife can enjoy the luxuries they’ve so desired–money, a chauffeur-driven limo, and a stunning home in a high-rise. Then Milton assigns Kevin one of the most notorious cases of the year, with a file that had been put together prior to the crime. Throwing himself into his work, Kevin begins to see a pattern of evil emerging from behind the firm’s plush facade. Acquittal after acquittal, every criminal client walks free, and Kevin’s suspicions slowly give way to terror. For Kevin has just become The Devil’s Advocate.

Carrie
by Neil Mitchell

Brian De Palma’s adaptation of Stephen King’s debut novel, Carrie (1976), is one of the defining films of 1970s “New Hollywood” style and a horror classic. The story of a teenage social outcast who discovers she possesses latent psychic powers that allow her to deliver retribution to her peers, teachers, and abusive mother, Carrie was an enormous commercial and critical success and is still one of the finest screen adaptations of a King novel. This contribution to the Devil’s Advocates series not only breaks the film down into its formal componenets–its themes, stylistic tropes, technical approaches, uses of color and sound, dialogue, and visual symbolism–but also considers a multitude of other factors contributing to the work’s classic status. The act of adapting King’s novel for the big screen, the origins of the novel itself, the place of Carrie in De Palma’s oeuvre, the subsequent versions and sequel, and the social, political, and cultural climate of the era (including the influence of second wave feminism, loosening sexual norms, and changing representations of adolescence), as well as the explosion of interest in and the evolution of the horror genre during the decade, are all shown to have played an important part in the film’s success and enduring reputation.

The Devil’s Advocate
by Taylor Caldwell

A revolution is waged against a totalitarian regime in this “courageous” novel of a dystopian near-future America by a #1 New York Times–bestselling author (Chicago Tribune).

In the heart of Philadelphia, insurgent Andrew Durant has been nursing a festering rage. And he’s not alone. Through underground networks, he’s found himself among a secret thousands, building an army called the Minute Men. They’re readying themselves for war to reclaim what was once America.
 
In the nation now known as the Democracy, independent thought is a thing of the past. The Constitution is waste paper. A conscienceless president has been appointed by the military—for life. The government has co-opted farmland crops. Citizens are divided between two classes: wealthy corporations and the destitute. Areas of the country devastated by war or natural disaster remain unchecked. On behalf of national security, neighbors are instructed to spy on one another. Exposing those who are undemocratic is law. And all dissenters are eliminated.
 
Durant, the chosen agent for the poverty-stricken rural Democracy, finds himself increasingly isolated and afraid. Mobilizing revolutionaries has become a dangerous tactic; the Minute Men have their own traitors, infiltrators assigned to undo everything Durant and his men are fighting to conquer. Now, the rebels have only their beliefs left to trust.
 
A stunning dystopian vision in the tradition of George Orwell’s 1984 and Ayn Rand’s Anthem, The Devil’s Advocate is author Taylor Caldwell’s “tour de force” (Kirkus Reviews). More than a half-century after its original publication, it is timelier than ever.
 
This ebook features an illustrated biography of Taylor Caldwell including rare images from the author’s estate.


The Devil’s Advocate
by Morris West

In an impoverished village in southern Italy, the enigmatic life and mysterious death of Giacomo Nerone has inspired talk of sainthood. Father Blaise Meredith, a dying English priest, is sent by the Vatican to investigate. As he tries to untangle the web of facts, rumors and outright lies that surround Nerone, The Devil’s Advocate reminds us how the power of goodness ultimately prevails over despair. The Devil’s Advocate was awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the W.H. Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, and was made into a film.

Devil’s Advocate: The Untold Story
by Karan Thapar

Sometime in the late summer of 1976, Sanjay Gandhi asked if I wanted to go flying with him… After first attempting to teach Karan Thapar to fly (not very successfully) Sanjay Gandhi took the controls and performed a series of aerobatics, not particularly dangerous but nonetheless thrilling. Once they were further away from Delhi, he became even more daring. Suddenly, he decided to scare the farmers working in the fields below by aiming the aircraft straight at them. As he dived down, they scattered and ran, fearing for their lives. At the last moment, Sanjay pulled up dramatically and waved at the bewildered farmers, clearly chuffed with the whole performance. The manoeuvre required nerves of steel and tremendous self-confidence, both of which Sanjay possessed in plenty. In Devil’s Advocate, Karan dives deep into his life to come up with many such moments. Included here are stories of warm and lasting friendships, such as with Benazir Bhutto, whom he met while he was an undergraduate. He also talks about his long association with Aung San Suu Kyi and Rajiv Gandhi. However, not all friendships lasted-for example, with L.K. Advani, with whom he shared a close bond until an unfortunate disagreement over an interview caused a falling-out. The tension generated during an interview has spilled over off-screen multiple times, and Karan discusses these incidents in detail. For instance, when Amitabh Bachchan lost his cool during a post-interview lunch or when Kapil Dev cried like a baby. And there’s the untold story of two of his most controversial interviews-with Jayalalithaa and Narendra Modi. While Jayalalithaa laughed it off later, the after-effects of Modi’s infamous walkout have grown worse with time. Riveting and fast-paced, Devil’s Advocate is as no-holds-barred as any of Karan Thapar’s interviews.

The Curse of Frankenstein
by Marcus K. Harmes

Critics abhorred it, audiences loved it, and Hammer executives where thrilled with the box office returns: The Curse of Frankenstein was big business. The 1957 film is the first to bring together in a horror movie the ‘unholy two’, Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing, together with the Hammer company, and director Terence Fisher, combinations now legendary among horror fans. In his Devil’s Advocate, Marcus Harmes goes back to where the Hammer horror production started, looking at the film from a variety of perspectives: as a loose literaryadaptation of Mary Shelley’s novel; as a film that had, for legal reasons, to avoid adapting from James Whale’s 1931 film for Universal Pictures; and as one which found immediate sources of inspiration in the Gainsborough bodice rippers of the 1940s and the poverty row horrors of the 1950s. Later Hammer horrors may have consolidated the reputation of the company and the stars, but these works had their starting point in the creative and commercial choices made by the team behind The Curse of Frankenstein. In the film sparks fly, new life is created and horrors unleashed but the film itself was a jolt to 1950s cinema going that has never been entirely surpassed.

The Devil’s Advocate
by Iain Morley

“[This] brings a fresh approach to the Dos and Don’ts of good advocacy. Written with humour in a conversational style, this work takes you through the practical application of advocacy, step by step. This … guide can be used in any adversarial courtroom, in any country, by advocates of up to five years’ experience … New for this edition: vulnerable witnesses; experts; Bar ethos; bail applications; document management; being led; how to cross examine inconsistent statements”–Publisher’s description.


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