Dylan On Dylan

Dylan on Dylan
by Jeff Burger

Dylan can be as evasive and abstruse as he is witty; he can be cranky and sarcastic. But in the right moments, he offers candid, revealing commentary about his groundbreaking music and creative process. Dylan on Dylan is an authoritative, chronologically arranged anthology of interviews, speeches and press conferences, as well as excerpts from nearly a hundred additional Q&As spanning Dylan’s entire career. The material comes from reknowned publications like Rolling Stone and from obscure periodicals like Minnesota Daily, a student newspaper at Dylan’s alma mater. Interviewers include some of the top music journalists of our time, such as Robert Love and Mikal Gilmore, as well as musicians like Pete Seeger and Happy Traum. Introductions put each piece in context and, in many cases, include the interviewer’s reminiscences about the encounter.

Bob Dylan
by Jonathan Cott

“A historical compilation to savor” (Los Angeles Times) that is “invaluable…irresistible” (The New York Times)—the ultimate collection of interviews and encounters with Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan, spanning his entire career from 1962 to today.

Bob Dylan: The Essential Interviews features over two dozen of the most significant and revealing conversations with the singer, gathered in one definitive collection that spans his career from street poet to Nobel Laureate. First published in 2006, this acclaimed collection brought together the best interviews and encounters with Bob Dylan to create a multi-faceted, cultural, and journalistic portrait of the artist and his legacy. This edition includes three additional pieces from Rolling Stone that update the volume to the present day.

Among the highlights are the seminal Rolling Stone interviews—anthologized here for the first time—by Jann Wenner, Jonathan Cott, Kurt Loder, Mikal Gilmore, Douglas Brinkley, and Jonathan Lethem—as well as Nat Hentoff’s legendary 1966 Playboy interview. Surprises include Studs Terkel’s radio interview in 1963 on WFMT in Chicago, the interview Dylan gave to screenwriter Jay Cocks when he was a student at Kenyon College in 1964, a 1965 interview with director Nora Ephron, and an interview Sam Shepard turned into a one-act play for Esquire in 1987.

Introduced by Rolling Stone editor Jonathan Cott, these intimate conversations from America’s most celebrated street poet is a “priceless collection with honest, open, and thoughtful musings…a fascinating window into his one-of-a-kind mind” (Publishers Weekly).


On the Road with Bob Dylan
by Larry Sloman

“The War and Peace of Rock and Roll.” —Bob Dylan

In 1975, as Bob Dylan emerged from eight years of seclusion, he dreamed of putting together a traveling music show that would trek across the country like a psychedelic carnival. The dream became reality, and On the Road with Bob Dylan is the ultimate behind-the-scenes look at what happened when Dylan and the Rolling Thunder Revue took to the streets of America.

With the intimate detail of a diary, Larry “Ratso” Sloman’s mesmerizing description of the legendary tour both transports us to a celebrated period in rock history and provides us with a vivid snapshot of Dylan during this extraordinary time. This reissue of the 1978 classic resonates more than ever as it chronicles one of the most glittering rock circuses ever assembled, with a cast that includes Joan Baez, Robbie Robertson, Joni Mitchell, Allen Ginsberg, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, and a wild entourage of groupies, misfits, sinners, and saints who trailed along for the ride. Sloman candidly captures the all-night revelry and musical prowess—from the backstage antics to impromptu jams—that made the tour a nearly mystical experience.

Complete with vintage photos and a new introduction by renowned Texas musician, mystery writer, and Revue member Kinky Friedman, this is an unparalleled treat for Dylan fans old and new. Without question, On the Road with Bob Dylan is a remarkable, revealing piece of writing and a rare up-close and personal view of Dylan on tour.


Bob Dylan in America
by Sean Wilentz

Sean Wilentz discovered Bob Dylan’s music as a teenager growing up in Greenwich Village. Now, almost half a century later, he revisits Dylan’s work with the skills of an eminent American historian as well as the passion of a fan.
 
Beginning with Dylan’s explosion onto the scene in 1961, Wilentz follows the emerging artist as he develops a body of work unique in America’s cultural history. Using his unprecedented access to studio tapes, recording notes, and rare photographs, he places Dylan’s music in the context of its time and offers a stunning critical appreciation of Dylan both as a songwriter and performer.
 


Dylan’s Visions of Sin
by Christopher Ricks

 

Bob Dylan
by Donald Brown

With Bob Dylan’s receipt of the Nobel Prize in Literature, his iconic status as an American musical, cultural, and poetic giant has never been more apparent. Bob Dylan: American Troubadour is the first book to look at Dylan’s career, from his first album to his late masterpiece Tempest. Donald Brown provides insightful critical commentary on Dylan’s prolific body of work, placing Dylan’s career in the context of its time in order to assess the relationship of Dylan’s music to contemporary American culture.

Each chapter follows the shifting versions of Dylan, from his songs of conscientious social involvement to more personal exploratory songs; from his influential rock albums of the mid-1960s to his adaptations of country music; from his three very different tours in the 1970s to his “born again” period as a proselytizer for Christ and his frustrations as a recording and performing artist in the 1980s; from his retrospective importance in the 1990s to the refreshingly vital albums he has been producing in the twenty-first century.

Bob Dylan: American Troubadour will engage not only Dylan fans and students of his work but also those interested in American popular music, history, and culture. Anyone who has been touched, challenged, or surprised by a Dylan song will enjoy this concise and informed critical exploration of Dylan’s music and his place in the American musical landscape.


Down the Highway
by Howard Sounes

“Bob Dylan was the first figure in the history of popular music to challenge the domination of the three-minute pop song and to bring serious ideas and poetry into the song lyric. He was also the first pop performer to adopt the attitudes and lead the life of a bohemian artist. In doing so he not only defined the direction which popular music would take in the second half of the last century, he also defined the lifestyle which would come to be associated with the pop artist. He was a true revolutionary and has become one of the iconic figures of contemporary popular culture. This major biography of Dylan is the first to give a complete picture of the man as well as of the artist and performer. While fully recognising his unique genius, it tells the full warts and all story of Bob Dylan s remarkable life from his childhood to the present day in compelling detail, putting equal emphasis on the private life and the music. Based on exhaustive research and an unprecedented number of new interviews with musicians and friends from all stages of his life, it combines revelatory stories with new anecdotes and insights into the enigmatic and extraordinary life of possibly the most infl

Why Bob Dylan Matters
by Richard F. Thomas

FULLY REVISED AND UPDATED.

“The coolest class on campus” – The New York Times

When the Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded to Bob Dylan in 2016, a debate raged. Some celebrated, while many others questioned the choice.  How could the world’s most prestigious book prize be awarded to a famously cantankerous singer-songwriter who wouldn’t even deign to attend the medal ceremony?

In Why Bob Dylan Matters, Harvard Professor Richard F. Thomas answers this question with magisterial erudition. A world expert on Classical poetry, Thomas was initially ridiculed by his colleagues for teaching a course on Bob Dylan alongside his traditional seminars on Homer, Virgil, and Ovid. Dylan’s Nobel Prize brought him vindication, and he immediately found himself thrust into the spotlight as a leading academic voice in all matters Dylanological. Today, through his wildly popular Dylan seminar—affectionately dubbed “Dylan 101″—Thomas is introducing a new generation of fans and scholars to the revered bard’s work.

This witty, personal volume is a distillation of Thomas’s famous course, and makes a compelling case for moving Dylan out of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and into the pantheon of Classical poets. Asking us to reflect on the question, “What makes a classic?”, Thomas offers an eloquent argument for Dylan’s modern relevance, while interpreting and decoding Dylan’s lyrics for readers. The most original and compelling volume on Dylan in decades, Why Bob Dylan Matters will illuminate Dylan’s work for the Dylan neophyte and the seasoned fanatic alike. You’ll never think about Bob Dylan in the same way again.

 


Dreaming of Dylan
by Mary Lee Kortes

Perhaps the only subject more fascinating than the mysterious world of dreams is the mysterious world of Bob Dylan. Dreaming of Dylan brings the two together for a weird and wonderful romp through the ways the mercurial musical master shows up in our subconscious states. Celebrated writer and musician Mary Lee Kortes lovingly curated this off-kilter collection of nocturnal visions. Paired with over 100 original images and illustrations, these dreams will captivate you in ways you never expected. Bob Dylan once sang, “I’ll let you be in my dreams if I can be in yours.” And be in them he has! There are plenty of musical dreamers here, from the incomparable Patti Smith to Squirrel Nut Zippers frontman Jimbo Mathus to Kevin Odegard, whose guitar is heard on the memorable intro to “Tangled Up in Blue,” and others. Not to mention the everyday dreamers, from plumbers to poets and pastors, from dentists to attorneys and psychotherapists. Some dreams are poignant; some are disturbing; and others are nothing short of bizarre. Taken together they’re an enthralling look at what the famously enigmatic singer/songwriter represents in the deepest recesses of our minds.

Tarantula
by Bob Dylan

WINNER OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN LITERATURE

Music legend Bob Dylan’s only work of fiction—a combination of stream of consciousness prose, lyrics, and poetry that gives fans insight into one of the most influential singer-songwriters of our time.

Written in 1966, Tarantula is a collection of poems and prose that evokes the turbulence of the times in which it was written, and offers unique insight into Dylan’s creative evolution, capturing the stream-of-consciousness preoccupations of the legendary folk poet and his eclectic, erudite cool at a crucial juncture in his artistic development. It has since been welcomed into the Dylan canon, as Dylan himself has cemented his place in the cultural imagination, inspiring Todd Haynes’s acclaimed 2007 musical drama I’m Not There, selling more than 100 million records, and winning numerous prizes, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2017.

In his acceptance speech for the Nobel, Dylan acknowledged the early influence on his work of Buddy Holly and Lead Belly as well as of wide-ranging classics like Don Quixote, All Quiet on the Western Front, and Moby Dick. Tarantula is a rare chance to see Dylan at a moment in which he was still deeply connected to his country roots and a folk vernacular while opening himself up to the influence of French 19th-century Surrealist writers like Arthur Rimbaud and the Comte de Lautreamont. A decade before the confessional singer-songwriter who would create the 1975 epic, Blood on the Tracks—which was just optioned by filmmaker Luca Guadagnino—here is Dylan at his most verbally playful and radically inventive.

Angry, funny, and strange, the poems and prose in this collection reflect the concerns found in Dylan’s most seminal music—a spirit of protest, a poetic spontaneity, and a chronicling of the eccentric and the everyday—which continue to make him a beloved artist and cultural icon.



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