India From Midnight To Milennium

India
by Shashi Tharoor

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, a new nation was born. It has 17 major languages and 22,000 distinct dialects. It has over a billion individuals of every ethnic extraction known to humanity. It has a population that is 32 percent illiterate, but also one of the worlds largest pools of trained scientists and engineers. Its ageless civilization is the birthplace of four major religions, a dozen different traditions of classical dance, and 300 ways of cooking a potato. Shashi Tharoors INDIA is a fascinating portrait of one of the worlds most interesting countriesits politics, its mentality, and its cultural riches. But it is also an eloquent argument for the importance of India to the future of America and the industrialized world. With the energy and erudition that distinguished his prize-winning novels, Tharoor points out that Indians account for a sixth of the worlds population and their choices will resonate throughout the globe. He deals with this vast theme in a work of remarkable depth and startling originality, combining elements of political scholarship, personal reflection, memoir, fiction, and polemic, all illuminated in vivid and compelling prose.

India : From Midnight to the Millennium
by Shashi Tharoor

&Lsquo;Well-Balanced, Informative And Highly Readable&Rsquo;&Mdash;Amartya Sen

India: From Midnight To The Millennium And Beyond Is An Eloquent Argument For The Importance Of India To The Future Of The Industrialized World. Shashi Tharoor Shows Compellingly That India Stands At The Intersection Of The Most Significant Questions Facing The World Today. If Democracy Leads To Inefficient Political Infighting, Should It Be Sacrificed In The Interest Of Economic Well-Being? Does Religious Fundamentalism Provide A Way For Countries In The Developing World To Assert Their Identity In The Face Of Western Hegemony, Or Is There A Case For Pluralism And Diversity Amid Cultural And Religious Traditions? Does The Entry Of Western Consumer Goods Threaten A Country&Rsquo;S Economic Self-Sufficiency, And Is Protectionism The Only Guarantee Of Independence? The Answers To Such Questions Will Determine What The Nature Of Our World Is In The Twenty-First Century. And Since Indians Account For Almost One-Sixth Of The World&Rsquo;S Population Today, Their Choices Will Resonate Throughout The Globe.

Shashi Tharoor Deals With This Vast Theme In A Work Of Remarkable Depth And Startling Originality, Combining Elements Of Political Scholarship, Personal Reflection, Memoir, Fiction, And Polemic, All Illuminated In Vivid And Compelling Prose.


India
by Shashi Tharoor

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, a new nation was born. It has seventeen major languages and 22,000 distinct dialects. It has over a billion individuals of every ethnic extraction known to humanity. It has a population that is 32 percent illiterate, but also one of the world’s largest pools of trained scientists and engineers. Its ageless civilization is the birthplace of four major religions, a dozen different traditions of classical dance, and three hundred ways of cooking a potato. Shashi Tharoor’s India is a fascinating portrait of one of the world’s most interesting countries—its politics, its mentality, and its cultural riches. An eloquent argument for the importance of India to the future of America and the industrialized world, the book flows with the energy and erudition that distinguished his prize-winning novels. A New York Times Notable Book, this work of remarkable depth and startling originality combines elements of political scholarship, personal reflection, memoir, fiction, and polemic, all illuminated in vivid and compelling prose.

India
by Shashi Tharoor

At the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, a new nation was born. It has seventeen major languages and 22,000 distinct dialects. It has over a billion individuals of every ethnic extraction known to humanity. It has a population that is 32 percent illiterate, but also one of the world’s largest pools of trained scientists and engineers. Its ageless civilization is the birthplace of four major religions, a dozen different traditions of classical dance, and three hundred ways of cooking a potato. Shashi Tharoor’s India is a fascinating portrait of one of the world’s most interesting countries—its politics, its mentality, and its cultural riches. An eloquent argument for the importance of India to the future of America and the industrialized world, the book flows with the energy and erudition that distinguished his prize-winning novels. A New York Times Notable Book, this work of remarkable depth and startling originality combines elements of political scholarship, personal reflection, memoir, fiction, and polemic, all illuminated in vivid and compelling prose.

The Great Indian Novel
by Shashi Tharoor

In this award-winning novel, Tharoor has masterfully recast the two-thousand-year-old epic, The Mahabharata, with fictional but highly recognizable events and characters from twentieth-century Indian politics. Nothing is sacred in this deliciously irreverent, witty, and deeply intelligent retelling of modern Indian history and the ancient Indian epic The Mahabharata. Alternately outrageous and instructive, hilarious and moving, it is a dazzling tapestry of prose and verse that satirically, but also poignantly, chronicles the struggle for Indian freedom and independence.

Nehru
by Shashi Tharoor

New from Shashi Tharoor, eminent United Nations diplomat and author of India: From Midnight to the Millennium, comes an incisive new biography of the great secularist, Jawaharlal Nehru, who – alongside his spiritual father, Mahatma Gandhi – led the movement for India’s independence from British rule and ushered his newly independent country into the modern world. ‘A well-crafted life of the Indian politician and independence-movement hero… A thoughtful account, likening Nehru to Thomas Jefferson in ways both positive and negative’ – Kirkus Reviews

The Elephant, the Tiger, and the Cell Phone
by Shashi Tharoor

For More Than Four Decades After Gaining Independence, India, With Its Massive Size And Population, Staggering Poverty And Slow Rate Of Growth, Was Associated With The Plodding, Somnolent Elephant, Comfortably Resting On Its Achievements Of Centuries Gone By. Then In The Early 1990S The Elephant Seemed To Wake Up From Its Slumber And Slowly Begin To Change Until Today, In The First Decade Of The Twenty-First Century, Some Have Begun To See It Morphing Into A Tiger. As India Turns Sixty, Shashi Tharoor, Novelist And Essayist, Reminds Us Of The Paradox That Is India, The Elephant That Is Becoming A Tiger: With The Highest Number Of Billionaires In Asia, It Still Has The Largest Number Of People Living Amid Poverty And Neglect, And More Children Who Have Not Seen The Inside Of A Schoolroom Than Any Other Country.

So What Does The Twenty-First Century Hold For India? Will It Bring The Strength Of The Tiger And The Size Of An Elephant To Bear Upon The World? Or Will It Remain An Elephant At Heart? In More Than Sixty Essays Organized Thematically Into Six Parts, Shashi Tharoor Analyses The Forces That Have Made Twenty-First Century India And Could Yet Unmake It. He Discusses The Country S Transformation In His Characteristic Lucid Prose, Writing With Passion And Engagement On A Broad Range Of Subjects, From The Very Notion Of Indianness In A Pluralist Society To The Evolution Of The Once Sleeping Giant Into A World Leader In The Realms Of Science And Technology; From The Men And Women Who Make Up His India Gandhi And Nehru And The Less Obvious Ramanujan And Krishna Menon To An Eclectic Array Of Indian Experiences And Realities, Virtual And Spiritual, Political And Filmi. The Book Is Leavened With Whimsical And Witty Pieces On Cricket, Bollywood And The National Penchant For Holidays, And Topped Off With An A To Z Glossary On Indianness, Written With Tongue Firmly In Cheek.

Diverting And Instructive As Ever, Artfully Combining Hard Facts And Statistics With Personal Opinions And Observations, Tharoor Offers A Fresh, Insightful Look At This Timeless And Fast-Changing Society, Emphasizing That India Must Rise Above The Past If It Is To Conquer The Future.


India
by Shashi Tharoor

“Few books in recent years, if any, offer such a comprehensive overview of what ails India, its politicians and its people; and few writers, apart from Nirad Chaudhury and V. S. Naipaul, benefit so obviously from the perspective Tharoor offers, that of an Indian with a profound empathy for his native culture, combined with the insight made possible by following India’s progress from afar.”
New York Times

“A hard-hitting, powerfully analytical and supremely articulate new book. . . . Tharoor discusses the ‘flawed miracle of Indian democracy’ from various angles, opting for a take-no-prisoners approach as he criticizes politicians, unpacks layers of misguided governmental policies and exposes the atavistic tendencies of special-interest pols.”
Newsday

“Tharoor looks back at his country’s first 50 years of independence, describing its challenges (illiteracy, poverty, sectarian violence and the ever-present caste problem) and its triumphs (a thriving democracy, a burgeoning economy) in lively, informative prose. He is particularly adept at describing all that India and Indians are not–not the same ethnicity, religion or language–to arrive at the nation’s essence: that ‘the singular thing about India was that you could only speak of it in the plural’.”
Seattle Times


The Five Dollar Smile
by Shashi Tharoor

This touching and funny collection of stories showcases Tharoor’s daunting literary acumen, as well as the keen sensitivity that informs his ability to write profoundly and entertainingly on themes ranging from family conflict to death. In the title story—written in a lonely hotel room in Geneva soon after the author began his work with the United Nations—a young Indian orphan is on his way to visit America for the first time, and his anguish and longing in the airplane seem hardly different from those of any American child. 
Tharoor’s admiration for P. G. Wodehouse makes “How Bobby Chatterjee Turned to Drink” a delightful homage, while “The Temple Thief,” “The Simple Man,” and “The Political Murder” bring to mind O. Henry and Maupassant. His three college stories, “Friends,” “The Pyre,” and “The Professor’s Daughter,” are full of youthful high jinks, naïve infatuations, and ingenious wordplay. “The Solitude of the Short-Story Writer” is a smart, self-aware, Woody Allen-esque exploration of a writer’s conflicted relationship with his psychiatrist.


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