Mein Kampf

Mein Kampf (My Struggle)
by Adolf Hitler

Mein Kampf (pronounced is an autobiographical manifesto by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, in which he outlines his political ideology and future plans for Germany. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926.The book was edited by the former Hieronymite friar Bernhard Stempfle who later died during the Night of the Long Knives.


Hitler’s Second Book
by Adolf Hitler

"Provides a valuable insight into the development of ideas that were to shape Hitler’s foreign policy after 1933."—Jeremy Noakes, The Times Literary Supplement

“The text bears all of Hitler’s hallmarks, along with a terrifying, sustained belief in war and violence as a means to ensure that Germany would flourish.”—Publishers Weekly

“He envisaged the German people becoming involved in a series of wars for Lebensraum culminating in an epic battle against America.”—Michael Smith, Daily Telegraph

“The Second Book is in many ways more important than Mein Kampf.”—Guardian

“I have never known anyone to say this is a forged document.”—Volker Berghahn, The New York Times

“Hitler admires the ‘young, racially select’ American people and the nation’s restrictive immigration policies at the time.”—The New York Times

“Far more than Mein Kampf, the Second Book establishes the grandiose scale of Hitler’s ambitions.”—Dennis Showalter, Colorado College

“More clearly than ever, Hitler sketched out the worldwide struggle against the Jews which he and his party had to lead.”—Richard Overy, Guardian

Hitler’s Second Book is the first complete and annotated edition of the manuscript Hitler dictated shortly before his rise to power four year after publishing Mein Kampf. It contains a catalog of shocking policy statements and previously undisclosed plans of world conquest at the core of Nazi ideology that Hitler concluded were too provocative for publication.


Mein Kampf
by Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler dictated the first half of Mein Kampf in 1923 while in prison following his unsuccessful revolt in Munich. Mein Kampf is part autobiography and part political ideology, explaining the mission statement of Adolf Hitler and the events in his life that shaped these ideas. Hitler wanted to title the book Four and a Half Years of Struggle Against Lies, Stupidity and Cowardice, but his publisher convinced him to change the title to Mein Kampf (My Struggle). The original title reflects Hitler’s attitude at the time regarding politics, and it reveals much of the subject matter of the book. It is invaluable to see inside the mind of such a tyrant to learn his motivations and the methods he used to gain power and commit such horrific atrocities. Studying the misdeeds of the past is necessary in preventing them from happening again. “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”-George Santayana.

Mein Kampf
by Adolf Hitler, General Press

Adolf Hitler wrote this book when he was in prison for his political activities. During that time, Germany had been weakened by the Treaty of Versailles, and France had seized several parts of Germany. France was also encouraging separatist movements in the Rhineland and in Bavaria.

After the First World War, the social and economic conditions in Germany were also deteriorating. In this scenario, many Germans were beginning to feel angry and resentful of the way their country had been treated by the Treaty of Versailles. Unrest was beginning to build up, and many political movements were springing up with dreams of reclaiming Germany’s lost power and status.

Hitler was part of the political movement that stood for the unity of the German nation and opposed the separatist movements. Hitler and his associates were arrested when they went on a march of protest  He was imprisoned in the Fort of Landsberg. This was the time when Hitler started writing Mein Kampf (My Struggle), which, more than an autobiography, was a declaration of his visions and plans for reclaiming the glory of the German nation.

It contains stories from his childhood, the events and situations that influenced his ideologies, and his prejudices. It explains his visions for German expansion through Europe, the Unification of Germany and Austria, and his assertion of the superiority of the ‘Aryan’ Race. The book contains the seeds of the Nazi vision for the mass extermination of the Jewish people.

Mein Kampf is the story of his life and a political manifesto that contains the beginnings of the ideas that resulted in all the atrocities committed by the Nazi party.

The book is considered historically important for various reasons. One of them is to analyze and understand how a single man was able to convince a whole nation to follow his ideas, good or bad. A study of the factors that made people follow him on a path that led to a Second World War.

(Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler, 9789380914855)


The Origins of the Holocaust
by Michael Robert Marrus

This edition is the first of its kind to offer a basic collection of facsimile, English language, historical articles on all aspects of the extermination of the European Jews. A total of 300 articles from 84 journals and collections allows the reader to gain an overview of this field. The edition both provides access to the immense, rich array of scholarly articles published after 1960 on the history of the Holocaust and encourages critical assessment of conflicting interpretations of these horrifying events. The series traces Nazi persecution of Jews before the implementation of the “Final Solution”, demonstrates how the Germans coordinated anti-Jewish activities in conquered territories, and sheds light on the victims in concentration camps, ending with the liberation of the concentration camp victims and articles on the trials of war criminals. The publications covered originate from the years 1950 to 1987. Included are authors such as Jakob Katz, Saul Friedländer, Eberhard Jäckel, Bruno Bettelheim and Herbert A. Strauss.


At the Strangers’ Gate
by Adam Gopnik

From The New York Times best-selling author of Paris to the Moon and beloved New Yorker writer, a memoir that captures the romance of New York City in the 1980s.

When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha, first arrived in 1980, New York City was a pilgrimage site for the young, the arty, and the ambitious. But it was also becoming a place where both life’s consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Strangers’ Gate is a vivid portrait of this time, told through the story of one couple’s journey—from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Through a series of comic mini-anthropologies that capture the fashion, publishing, and art worlds of the era, Adam Gopnik transports us from his tiny basement room on the Upper East Side to a SoHo loft, from his time as a graduate student-cum-library-clerk to the galleries of MoMA. Filled with tender and humorous reminiscences—including affectionate reflections on Richard Avedon, Robert Hughes, and Jeff Koons, among many others—At the Strangers’ Gate is an ode to New York striving.


On Hitler’s Mein Kampf
by Albrecht Koschorke

An examination of the narrative strategies employed in the most dangerous book of the twentieth century and a reflection on totalitarian literature.

Hitler’s Mein Kampf was banned in Germany for almost seventy years, kept from being reprinted by the accidental copyright holder, the Bavarian Ministry of Finance. In December 2015, the first German edition of Mein Kampf since 1946 appeared, with Hitler’s text surrounded by scholarly commentary apparently meant to act as a kind of cordon sanitaire. And yet the dominant critical assessment (in Germany and elsewhere) of the most dangerous book of the twentieth century is that it is boring, unoriginal, jargon-laden, badly written, embarrassingly rabid, and altogether ludicrous. (Even in the 1920s, the consensus was that the author of such a book had no future in politics.) How did the unreadable Mein Kampf manage to become so historically significant? In this book, German literary scholar Albrecht Koschorke attempts to explain the power of Hitler’s book by examining its narrative strategies.

Koschorke argues that Mein Kampf cannot be reduced to an ideological message directed to all readers. By examining the text and the signals that it sends, he shows that we can discover for whom Hitler strikes his propagandistic poses and who is excluded. Koschorke parses the borrowings from the right-wing press, the autobiographical details concocted to make political points, the attack on the Social Democrats that bleeds into an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory, the contempt for science, and the conscious attempt to trigger outrage.

A close reading of National Socialism’s definitive text, Koschorke concludes, can shed light on the dynamics of fanaticism. This lesson of Mein Kampf still needs to be learned.


Revolt Against the Modern World
by Julius Evola

With unflinching gaze and uncompromising intensity Julius Evola analyzes the spiritual and cultural malaise at the heart of Western civilization and all that passes for progress in the modern world. As a gadfly, Evola spares no one and nothing in his survey of what we have lost and where we are headed. At turns prophetic and provocative, Revolt against the Modern World outlines a profound metaphysics of history and demonstrates how and why we have lost contact with the transcendent dimension of being.

The revolt advocated by Evola does not resemble the familiar protests of either liberals or conservatives. His criticisms are not limited to exposing the mindless nature of consumerism, the march of progress, the rise of technocracy, or the dominance of unalloyed individualism, although these and other subjects come under his scrutiny. Rather, he attempts to trace in space and time the remote causes and processes that have exercised corrosive influence on what he considers to be the higher values, ideals, beliefs, and codes of conduct–the world of Tradition–that are at the foundation of Western civilization and described in the myths and sacred literature of the Indo‑Europeans. Agreeing with the Hindu philosophers that history is the movement of huge cycles and that we are now in the Kali Yuga, the age of dissolution and decadence, Evola finds revolt to be the only logical response for those who oppose the materialism and ritualized meaninglessness of life in the twentieth century.

Through a sweeping study of the structures, myths, beliefs, and spiritual traditions of the major Western civilizations, the author compares the characteristics of the modern world with those of traditional societies. The domains explored include politics, law, the rise and fall of empires, the history of the Church, the doctrine of the two natures, life and death, social institutions and the caste system, the limits of racial theories, capitalism and communism, relations between the sexes, and the meaning of warriorhood. At every turn Evola challenges the reader’s most cherished assumptions about fundamental aspects of modern life.

A controversial scholar, philosopher, and social thinker, JULIUS EVOLA (1898-1974) has only recently become known to more than a handful of English‑speaking readers. An authority on the world’s esoteric traditions, Evola wrote extensively on ancient civilizations and the world of Tradition in both East and West. Other books by Evola published by Inner Traditions include Eros and the Mysteries of Love, The Yoga of Power, The Hermetic Tradition, and The Doctrine of Awakening.


The Occult Roots of Nazism
by Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke

Nearly half a century after the defeat of the Third Reich, Nazism remains a subject of extensive historical inquiry, general interest, and, alarmingly, a source of inspiration for resurgent fascism in Europe. Goodrick-Clarke’s powerful and timely book traces the intellectual roots of Nazism back to a number of influential occult and millenarian sects in the Habsburg Empire during its waning years. These sects combined notions of popular nationalism with an advocacy of Aryan racism and a proclaimed need for German world-rule.

This book provides the first serious account of the way in which Nazism was influenced by powerful millenarian and occult sects that thrived in Germany and Austria almost fifty years before the rise to power of Adolf Hitler.

These millenarian sects (principally the Ariosophists) espoused a mixture of popular nationalism, Aryan racism, and occultism to support their advocacy of German world-rule. Over time their ideas and symbols, filtered through nationalist-racist groups associated with the infant Nazi party, came to exert a strong influence on Himmler’s SS.

The fantasies thus fueled were played out with terrifying consequences in the realities structured into the Third Reich: Auschwitz, Sobibor, and Treblinka, the hellish museums of Nazi apocalypse, had psychic roots reaching back to millenial visions of occult sects. Beyond what the TImes Literary Supplement calls an intriguing study of apocalyptic fantasies, this bizarre and fascinating story contains lessons we cannot afford to ignore.


Mein Kampf
by Adolf Hitler

Book Description In 1922, just four years after the war to end all wars, an unknown Austrian then living in Bavaria planned a pamphlet to be called Settling Accounts. In it he intended to attack the ineffectiveness of the dominant political parties in Germany which were opposed to the new National Socialists (Nazis). In November 1923, Adolf Hitler was jailed for the abortive Munich Beer Hall putsch along with men willing and able to assist him with his writing. With the help of these collaborators, chief among them Rudolf Hess, the pamphlet became a book. Settling Accounts became Mein Kampf, an unparalleled example of muddled economics and history, appalling bigotry, and an intense self-glorification of Adolf Hitler as the true founder and builder of the National Socialist movement. It was written in hate and it contained a blueprint for violent bloodshed. When Mein Kampf was published in 1925, it was a failure. In 1926 a second volume appeared – it was no more successful than the first. People either laughed at it or ignored it. They were wrong to do so. As Hitler’s power increased, pressure was put on all party members to buy the book. Gradually this pressure was extended to all elements of the German population. Soon Mein Kampf was even being passed out to newlywed couples as a gift. Ironically, and frighteningly, by the time Hitler came to power on January 30, 1933, what has been considered by many to be the most satanic book ever written was running neck and neck with the Bible at the top of the German bestseller lists. In his excellent introduction to this definitive American translation of Mein Kampf, Konrad Heiden writes: "For years Mein Kampf stood as proof of the blindness and complacency of the world. For in its pages Hitler announced — long before he came to power — a program of blood and terror in a self-revelation of such overwhelming frankness that few among its readers had the courage to believe it … That such a man could go so far toward realizing his ambitions, and — above all — could find millions of willing tools and helpers; that is a phenomenon the world will ponder for centuries to come." We would be wrong in thinking that such a program, such a man, and such appalling consequences could not reappear in our world of the present. We cannot permit our selves the luxury of forgetting the tragedy of World War II or the man who, more than any other, fostered it. Mein Kampf must be read and constantly remembered as a specimen of evil demagoguery that people whenever men grow tired of thinking and acting for themselves. Mein Kampf is a blueprint for the age of chaos. It transcends in historical importance any other book of the present generation. In his translation Ralph Manheim has taken particular care to give an exact English equivalent of Hitler’s highly individual, and often awkward style, including his occasional grammatical errors. We believe this book should stand as the complete, final, and definitive English version of Hitler’s own story of his life, his political philosophy, and his thwarted plans for world domination. Translated by Ralph Manheim with an introduction by Konrad Heiden. A compilation of Hitler’s most famous prison writings of 1923–the bible of National Socialism and the blueprint for the Third Reich.


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