Moon And Sixpence

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

"Witty, compelling." — The Boston Globe. Gripped by an overwhelming obsession, Charles Strickland, a conventional London stockbroker, decides in midlife to desert his wife, family, business, and civilization for his art. One of Maugham’s most popular works, The Moon and Sixpence is a riveting story about an uncompromising and self-destructive man who forsakes wealth and comfort to pursue the life of a painter. Drifting from Paris to Marseilles, Strickland eventually settles in Tahiti, takes a mistress, and in spite of poverty and a long, terminal illness, produces his most passionate and mysterious works of art.
Loosely based on the life of Paul Gauguin, Maugham’s timeless masterpiece is storytelling at its best — an insightful work focusing on artistic fixation that propels the artist beyond the commonplace into the selfish realm of genius.

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

The Moon and Sixpence is a fictional novel heavily influenced by the life of French painter Paul Gauguin. The novel is told first-person, dipping episodically into the mind of the artist. Charles Strickland is an English stock broker, who leaves everything behind him in his middle age to live in defiant squalor in Paris as an artist. His genius is eventually recognized by a Dutch painter.

The Moon and Sixpence
by William Somerset Maugham

This title tells the story of Charles Strickland, a conventional stockbroker who abandons his wife and children for Prais and Tahiti, to live his life as a painter. Whilst his betrayal of family, duty and honour gives him the freedom to achieve greatness, his decision leads to an obsession which carries severe implications.

The Moon and Sixpence
by William Somerset Maugham

Based closely on the life of the French painter Paul Gauguin. It tells of Charles Strickland, a stock broker who deserts his wife, family, and business in order to live and paint in Tahiti.

The Moon and Sixpence: One Man’s Journey Across the Field of Art and into Its Depths (Based on Paul Gauguin’s Life)
by William Somerset Maugham

This carefully crafted ebook: "The Moon and Sixpence: One Man’s Journey Across the Field of Art and into Its Depths (Based on Paul Gauguin’s Life)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Moon and Sixpence is a novel by W Somerset Maugham, told in episodic form by a first-person narrator, in a series of glimpses into the mind and soul of the central character Charles Strickland, a middle-aged English stockbroker, who abandons his wife and children abruptly to pursue his desire to become an artist. It is based on the life of the painter Paul Gauguin. William Somerset Maugham (1874–1965) was a British playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and reputedly the highest paid author during the 1930s.

The Moon and Sixpence
by W. Somerset Maugham

This Squid Ink Classic includes the full text of the work plus MLA style citations for scholarly secondary sources, peer-reviewed journal articles and critical essays for when your teacher requires extra resources in MLA format for your research paper.

The Modern Eye: Literature and the Art Aesthetics – “The Moon and Sixpence”
by Marcio Hemerique Pereira

Essay from the year 2011 in the subject English – Literature, Works, grade: A, Birkbeck, University of London (Humanities), course: Modernist Literature and Modern Art, language: English, abstract: Only few contemporary authors have been praised as highly and condemned as completely as W. Somerset Maugham. The present essay discusses Maugham’s novel ‘The Moon and Sixpence.’ My concerns lay on key questions that I try to explore. First and foremost, what do we learn about the presentation of the early twentieth century artist from Maugham? Are, in fact, artistic techniques used in the literary portrait (depictions) of the artist? What do we learn about modern art from the text? Why is Maugham writing about an artist? How can literature depict artist and artistic processes? Now I propose to attempt at least to suggest the reasons for, if not to reconcile, opinions as widely different as the ones presented further in the essay and, at the same time, to offer a less impetuous and more carefully substantiated criticism of Maugham’s fictional work, ‘The Moon and Sixpence.’


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