Moon Is Down

The Moon Is Down
by John Steinbeck

The Moon is Down chronicles the uncontrollable, unalterable chain of events that is released by an act of brutality. In a masterful tale of the effects of invasion on both conquerer and conquered, John Steinbeck delves into the motivations and emotions of a German commander who is only following orders, and paints a devastatingly accurate portrait of a Norwegian traitor. He brings brilliantly to life the patriotic fervor of the men and women of the Norwegian underground who refused to let their spirit die.

The Moon is Down
by John Steinbeck

Occupied by enemy troops, a small, peaceable town comes face-to-face with evil imposed from the outside – and betrayal born within the close-knit community. AS he delves into the motivations and emotions of the enemy commander and the quisling traitor, Steinbeck uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war – and about human nature. Steinbeck’s self-described ‘celebration of the durability of democracy’ had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe.

John Steinbeck Goes to War
by Donald V. Coers

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In March 1942, a desperate period for the allies in World War II, John Steinbeck published his propaganda novel The Moon is Down—the story of ruthless invaders who overrun a militarily helpless country. Throughout the novel, Steinbeck underscored both the fatal weakness of the “invincible” unnamed aggressors and the inherent power of the human values shard by the “conquered” people.

The Moon is Down created an immediate sensation among American literary critics; fierce debate erupted over Steinbeck’s uncommonly sympathetic portrayal of the enemy and the novel’s power as a vehicle for propaganda. Fifty years later, Coers continues the debate, relying heavily on unpublished letters and personal interviews with the lawyers, book dealers, actors, publishers, and housewives associated with the resistance movements in Western Europe. Clandestine translations of The Moon Is Down quickly appeared and were widely circulated under the noses of the Gestapo. Coers documents the fate of Steinbeck’s novel in the hands of World War II resistance fighters and deepens our appreciation of Steinbeck’s unique ability to express the feelings of oppressed peoples.


John Steinbeck Goes to War
by Donald V. Coers

Normal0falsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONEMicrosoftInternetExplorer4

In March 1942, a desperate period for the allies in World War II, John Steinbeck published his propaganda novel The Moon is Down—the story of ruthless invaders who overrun a militarily helpless country. Throughout the novel, Steinbeck underscored both the fatal weakness of the “invincible” unnamed aggressors and the inherent power of the human values shard by the “conquered” people.

The Moon is Down created an immediate sensation among American literary critics; fierce debate erupted over Steinbeck’s uncommonly sympathetic portrayal of the enemy and the novel’s power as a vehicle for propaganda. Fifty years later, Coers continues the debate, relying heavily on unpublished letters and personal interviews with the lawyers, book dealers, actors, publishers, and housewives associated with the resistance movements in Western Europe. Clandestine translations of The Moon Is Down quickly appeared and were widely circulated under the noses of the Gestapo. Coers documents the fate of Steinbeck’s novel in the hands of World War II resistance fighters and deepens our appreciation of Steinbeck’s unique ability to express the feelings of oppressed peoples.


The Moon is Down
by John Steinbeck

THE STORY: The play begins in an unknown town that has just been occupied by a small regiment of enemy soldiers. With no alternative, the mayor of the town agrees to meet with the enemy to try to work out a plan for peaceful coexistence before the

Of Mice and Men and The Moon Is Down
by John Steinbeck

Two devastating short novels adapted for the stage by Steinbeck himself

This Penguin Classics edition celebrates Steinbeck’s dramatic adaptations of his most powerful short novels, Of Mice and Men and The Moon Is Down, featuring a foreword by award-winning actor James Earl Jones.

Of Mice and Men represents an experiment in form – as Steinbeck put it, “a kind of playable novel, written in novel form but so scened and set that it can be played as it stands.” A rarity in American letters, it achieved remarkable success as a novel, a Broadway play, and three acclaimed films. Of Mice and Men received the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play in 1937-1938. A number of acclaimed actors have interpreted the iconic roles of George and Lennie for stage and screen, including James Earl Jones, John Malkovich and Gary Sinise.

The Moon Is Down uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war and human nature. It tells the story of a peaceable town taken by enemy troops, and had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe.

This Penguin Classics edition of the theatrical adaptations of Steinbeck’s two classic short novels is essential to actors, playwrights, filmmakers and directors studying the dramatic work of the Nobel Prize winning author of The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

From the Trade Paperback edition.


Sing Down the Moon
by Scott O’Dell

The Navajo tribe’s forced march from their homeland to Fort Sumner by white soldiers and settlers is dramatically and courageously told by young Bright Morning.

Journal of a Novel
by John Steinbeck

Each working day from January 29 to November 1, 1951, John Steinbeck warmed up to the work of writing East of Eden with a letter to the late Pascal Covici, his friend and editor at The Viking Press. It was his way, he said, of “getting my mental arm in shape to pitch a good game.”

 

Steinbeck’s letters were written on the left-hand pages of a notebook in which the facing pages would be filled with the test of East of Eden. They touched on many subjects—story arguments, trial flights of workmanship, concern for his sons.

Part autobiography, part writer’s workshop, these letters offer an illuminating perspective on Steinbeck’s creative process, and a fascinating glimpse of Steinbeck, the private man.



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