Nature Of Statistical Learning Theory

The Nature of Statistical Learning Theory
by Vladimir N. Vapnik

The aim of this book is to discuss the fundamental ideas which lie behind the statistical theory of learning and generalization. It considers learning from the general point of view of function estimation based on empirical data. Omitting proofs and technical details, the author concentrates on discussing the main results of learning theory and their connections to fundamental problems in statistics. These include: – the general setting of learning problems and the general model of minimizing the risk functional from empirical data – a comprehensive analysis of the empirical risk minimization principle and shows how this allows for the construction of necessary and sufficient conditions for consistency – non-asymptotic bounds for the risk achieved using the empirical risk minimization principle – principles for controlling the generalization ability of learning machines using small sample sizes – introducing a new type of universal learning machine that controls the generalization ability.

The Nature of Statistical Learning Theory
by Vladimir Vapnik

The aim of this book is to discuss the fundamental ideas which lie behind the statistical theory of learning and generalization. It considers learning as a general problem of function estimation based on empirical data. Omitting proofs and technical details, the author concentrates on discussing the main results of learning theory and their connections to fundamental problems in statistics. These include: * the setting of learning problems based on the model of minimizing the risk functional from empirical data * a comprehensive analysis of the empirical risk minimization principle including necessary and sufficient conditions for its consistency * non-asymptotic bounds for the risk achieved using the empirical risk minimization principle * principles for controlling the generalization ability of learning machines using small sample sizes based on these bounds * the Support Vector methods that control the generalization ability when estimating function using small sample size. The second edition of the book contains three new chapters devoted to further development of the learning theory and SVM techniques. These include: * the theory of direct method of learning based on solving multidimensional integral equations for density, conditional probability, and conditional density estimation * a new inductive principle of learning. Written in a readable and concise style, the book is intended for statisticians, mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists. Vladimir N. Vapnik is Technology Leader AT&T Labs-Research and Professor of London University. He is one of the founders of statistical learning theory, and the author of seven books published in English, Russian, German, and Chinese.

The Nature of Statistical Learning Theory
by Vladimir Vapnik

The aim of this book is to discuss the fundamental ideas which lie behind the statistical theory of learning and generalization. It considers learning as a general problem of function estimation based on empirical data. Omitting proofs and technical details, the author concentrates on discussing the main results of learning theory and their connections to fundamental problems in statistics. These include: * the setting of learning problems based on the model of minimizing the risk functional from empirical data * a comprehensive analysis of the empirical risk minimization principle including necessary and sufficient conditions for its consistency * non-asymptotic bounds for the risk achieved using the empirical risk minimization principle * principles for controlling the generalization ability of learning machines using small sample sizes based on these bounds * the Support Vector methods that control the generalization ability when estimating function using small sample size. The second edition of the book contains three new chapters devoted to further development of the learning theory and SVM techniques. These include: * the theory of direct method of learning based on solving multidimensional integral equations for density, conditional probability, and conditional density estimation * a new inductive principle of learning. Written in a readable and concise style, the book is intended for statisticians, mathematicians, physicists, and computer scientists. Vladimir N. Vapnik is Technology Leader AT&T Labs-Research and Professor of London University. He is one of the founders of statistical learning theory, and the author of seven books published in English, Russian, German, and Chinese.

An Introduction to Statistical Learning
by Gareth James, Daniela Witten, Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani

An Introduction to Statistical Learning provides an accessible overview of the field of statistical learning, an essential toolset for making sense of the vast and complex data sets that have emerged in fields ranging from biology to finance to marketing to astrophysics in the past twenty years. This book presents some of the most important modeling and prediction techniques, along with relevant applications. Topics include linear regression, classification, resampling methods, shrinkage approaches, tree-based methods, support vector machines, clustering, and more. Color graphics and real-world examples are used to illustrate the methods presented. Since the goal of this textbook is to facilitate the use of these statistical learning techniques by practitioners in science, industry, and other fields, each chapter contains a tutorial on implementing the analyses and methods presented in R, an extremely popular open source statistical software platform.

Two of the authors co-wrote The Elements of Statistical Learning (Hastie, Tibshirani and Friedman, 2nd edition 2009), a popular reference book for statistics and machine learning researchers. An Introduction to Statistical Learning covers many of the same topics, but at a level accessible to a much broader audience. This book is targeted at statisticians and non-statisticians alike who wish to use cutting-edge statistical learning techniques to analyze their data. The text assumes only a previous course in linear regression and no knowledge of matrix algebra.


Statistical Learning Theory and Stochastic Optimization
by Olivier Catoni

Statistical learning theory is aimed at analyzing complex data with necessarily approximate models. This book is intended for an audience with a graduate background in probability theory and statistics. It will be useful to any reader wondering why it may be a good idea, to use as is often done in practice a notoriously “wrong” (i.e. over-simplified) model to predict, estimate or classify. This point of view takes its roots in three fields: information theory, statistical mechanics, and PAC-Bayesian theorems. Results on the large deviations of trajectories of Markov chains with rare transitions are also included. They are meant to provide a better understanding of stochastic optimization algorithms of common use in computing estimators. The author focuses on non-asymptotic bounds of the statistical risk, allowing one to choose adaptively between rich and structured families of models and corresponding estimators. Two mathematical objects pervade the book: entropy and Gibbs measures. The goal is to show how to turn them into versatile and efficient technical tools, that will stimulate further studies and results.


Estimation of Dependences Based on Empirical Data
by V. Vapnik

Twenty-?ve years have passed since the publication of the Russian version of the book Estimation of Dependencies Based on Empirical Data (EDBED for short). Twen- ?ve years is a long period of time. During these years many things have happened. Looking back, one can see how rapidly life and technology have changed, and how slow and dif?cult it is to change the theoretical foundation of the technology and its philosophy. I pursued two goals writing this Afterword: to update the technical results presented in EDBED (the easy goal) and to describe a general picture of how the new ideas developed over these years (a much more dif?cult goal). The picture which I would like to present is a very personal (and therefore very biased) account of the development of one particular branch of science, Empirical – ference Science. Such accounts usually are not included in the content of technical publications. I have followed this rule in all of my previous books. But this time I would like to violate it for the following reasons. First of all, for me EDBED is the important milestone in the development of empirical inference theory and I would like to explain why. S- ond, during these years, there were a lot of discussions between supporters of the new 1 paradigm (now it is called the VC theory ) and the old one (classical statistics).

Measures of Complexity
by Vladimir Vovk, Harris Papadopoulos, Alexander Gammerman

This book brings together historical notes, reviews of research developments, fresh ideas on how to make VC (Vapnik–Chervonenkis) guarantees tighter, and new technical contributions in the areas of machine learning, statistical inference, classification, algorithmic statistics, and pattern recognition.

The contributors are leading scientists in domains such as statistics, mathematics, and theoretical computer science, and the book will be of interest to researchers and graduate students in these domains.


Statistical Learning and Data Sciences
by Alexander Gammerman, Vladimir Vovk, Harris Papadopoulos

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Statistical Learning and Data Sciences, SLDS 2015, held in Egham, Surrey, UK, April 2015.
The 36 revised full papers presented together with 2 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 59 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on statistical learning and its applications, conformal prediction and its applications, new frontiers in data analysis for nuclear fusion, and geometric data analysis.

The Elements of Statistical Learning
by Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani, Jerome Friedman

During the past decade there has been an explosion in computation and information technology. With it have come vast amounts of data in a variety of fields such as medicine, biology, finance, and marketing. The challenge of understanding these data has led to the development of new tools in the field of statistics, and spawned new areas such as data mining, machine learning, and bioinformatics. Many of these tools have common underpinnings but are often expressed with different terminology. This book describes the important ideas in these areas in a common conceptual framework. While the approach is statistical, the emphasis is on concepts rather than mathematics. Many examples are given, with a liberal use of color graphics. It is a valuable resource for statisticians and anyone interested in data mining in science or industry. The book’s coverage is broad, from supervised learning (prediction) to unsupervised learning. The many topics include neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and boosting—the first comprehensive treatment of this topic in any book.

This major new edition features many topics not covered in the original, including graphical models, random forests, ensemble methods, least angle regression & path algorithms for the lasso, non-negative matrix factorization, and spectral clustering. There is also a chapter on methods for “wide” data (p bigger than n), including multiple testing and false discovery rates.

Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani, and Jerome Friedman are professors of statistics at Stanford University. They are prominent researchers in this area: Hastie and Tibshirani developed generalized additive models and wrote a popular book of that title. Hastie co-developed much of the statistical modeling software and environment in R/S-PLUS and invented principal curves and surfaces. Tibshirani proposed the lasso and is co-author of the very successful An Introduction to the Bootstrap. Friedman is the co-inventor of many data-mining tools including CART, MARS, projection pursuit and gradient boosting.



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