Philosophy: Who Needs It

Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

This collection of essays was the last work planned by Ayn Rand before her death in 1982. In it, she summarizes her view of philosophy and deals with a broad spectrum of topics.

According to Ayn Rand, the choice we make is not whether to have a philosophy, but which one to have: rational, conscious, and therefore practical; or contradictory, unidentified, and ultimately lethal.

Written with all the clarity and eloquence that have placed Ayn Rand’s Objectivist philosophy in the mainstream of American thought, these essays range over such basic issues as education, morality, censorship, and inflation to prove that philosophy is the fundamental force in all our lives.


Philosophy
by Ayn Rand

In these essays, Ayn Rand reveals the hidden philosophic premises at work in the human soul. Her powerful mind ranges to every corner of the culture; her brilliant pen writes with the dispassionate clarity and passionate eloquence that are her literary trademarks. The book’s theme is expressed in the title essay, originally given as an address to a graduating class at West Point. To the question: “Who needs philosophy?” Miss Rand answere: “Everyone.” “A philosophic system,” she writes, “is and intefrated view of existence. As a human being, you have no choice about the fact that you need philosophy. Your only choice is whether you define your philosophy by conscious, rational, disciplined process of thought…or let your subconscious accumulate a junk heap of unwarranted conclusions……..” Philosophy, according to Ayn Rand, is the fundamental factor in human life; consciously or subconsciously, it is the basic factor that shapes the character of men, and the culture and destiny of nations. It shapes them for good or for evil, depending on the kind of philosophy they accept. Our choice, Miss Rand holds, is this : a philosophy of reason, rational selfishness, and laissez-faire capitalism–or a philosophy of irrationalism, altruism, and collectivism. Today’s world, she believes, is being destroyed by these latter ideas. The philosophy of reason she offers as the alternative is called Objectivism.

The Ayn Rand Lexicon
by Ayn Rand

A prolific writer, bestselling novelist, and world-renowned philosopher, Ayn Rand defined a full system of thought–from epistemology to aesthetics. Her writing is so extensive and the range of issues she covers so enormous that those interested in finding her discussions of a given topic may have to search through many sources to locate the relevant passage. The Ayn Rand Lexicon brings together all the key ideas of her philosophy of Objectivism. Begun under Rand’s supervision, this unique volume is an invaluable guide to her philosophy or reason, self-interest and laissez-faire capitalism–the philosophy so brilliantly dramatized in her novels The Fountainhead, We the Living, and Anthem.

Why Businessmen Need Philosophy
by Debi Ghate, Richard E. Ralston

The intellectual tooks every business person needs in the boardroom. Includes two rare essays by Ayn Rand!

With government and the media blaming big business for the world economic crisis, capitalism needs all the help it can get. It’s the perfect time for this collection of essays presenting a philosophical defense of capitalism by Ayn Rand and other Objectivist intellectuals. Essential and practical, Why Businessmen Need Philosophy reveals the importance of maintaining philosophical principles in the corporate environment at all levels of business from daily operations to executive decisions, and provides the tactical and tactful rational thinking required to defend companies from ideological attacks.


The Voice of Reason
by Ayn Rand

Between 1961, when she gave her first talk at the Ford Hall Forum in Boston, and 1981, when she gave the last talk of her life in New Orleans, Ayn Rand spoke and wrote about topics as varied as education, medicine, Vietnam, and the death of Marilyn Monroe. In The Voice of Reason, these pieces, written in the last decades of Rand’s life, are gathered in book form for the first time. With them are five essays by Leonard Peikoff, Rand’s longtime associate and literary executor. The work concludes with Peikoff’s epilogue, “My Thirty Years With Ayn Rand: An Intellectual Memoir,” which answers the question “What was Ayn Rand really like?” Important reading for all thinking individuals, Rand’s later writings reflect a life lived on principle, a probing mind, and a passionate intensity. This collection communicates not only Rand’s singular worldview, but also the penetrating cultural and political analysis to which it gives rise.

For the New Intellectual
by Ayn Rand

Here is Ayn Rand’s first non-fiction work—a challenge to the prevalent philosophical doctrines of our time and the “atmosphere of guilt, of panic, of despair, of boredom, and of all-pervasive evasion” that they create.

As incisive and relevant today as it was sixty years ago, this book presents the essentials of Ayn Rand’s philosophy “for those who wish to acquire an integrated view of existence.” In the title essay, she offers an analysis of Western culture, discusses the causes of its progress, its decline, its present bankruptcy, and points the road to an intellectual renaissance.

One of the most controversial figures on the intellectual scene, Ayn Rand was the proponent of a moral philosophy—and ethic of rational self-interest—that stands in sharp opposition to the ethics of altruism and self-sacrifice. The fundamentals of this morality—”a philosophy for living on Earth”—are here vibrantly set forth by the spokesman for a new class, For the New Intellectual.



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