The Heart Of A Boy

The Heart of a Boy
by Kate T. Parker

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER.

It’s time to celebrate boys. 
 
Against the backdrop of a growing national conversation about how to raise sons to become good people, Kate T. Parker is leading the way by turning her lens on boys. Author of the bestselling book about girls Strong Is the New Pretty, she now shows the true heart of a boy in 200 compelling photographs.
 
Boys can be wild. But they can also be gentle. Bursting with confidence, but not afraid to be vulnerable. Ready to run fearlessly downfield—or reach out to a friend in need. In this empowering, deeply felt celebration of boys being—and believing in—themselves, see the unguarded joy of a little brother hugging his big brother. The inquisitive look of a young scientist examining a bug. The fearless self-expression in a ballet dancer’s poise. There are guitarists, fencers, wrestlers, stargazers, a pilot. Boys who aspire to be president, and boys whose lives are full of overwhelming challenges, yet who bravely face each day as it comes.
With inspiring and joyful quotes from the boys themselves, this book spreads a heartfelt, uplifting message of openness, self-confidence, and warmth.
 
“Kate T. Parker’s incredible Strong Is the New Pretty helped us reimagine girlhood as silly, messy, spirited, and fun. Now she turns her perceptive lens on the other sex to expand our definition of what it means to be a boy . . . and presents something desperately needed in our well-meaning cultural conversation about boys—she shows us their enormous, wonderful hearts.”—Michael Ian Black, actor and writer
 
“Silly, serious, nerdy, athletic, creative, bold—the adjectives describing boys could go on for pages. But if boys are to grow up to be admirable men, the one thing they must be is kind. Kate T. Parker’s book helps clear the way for a time when everyone understands that.” — R. J. Palacio, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Wonder
 
“Every parent who picks up this book will be grateful for the impact it will have on their family.” —Gary Vaynerchuk, author of Crushing It!
 


Henry’s Heart
by Charise Mericle Harper

Henry (and his heart) are perfectly happy playing indoors. But Henry’s mom encourages him to go for a walk outside. Soon, Henry’s heart starts beating faster. Is Henry riding a rollercoaster? Is he doing jumping jacks? What could be making Henry’s heart beat faster?

In this engaging, informative story, children learn about the many ways the heart functions within the body, and how what we see, hear, and feel can directly affect our heart rate (like falling in love with a puppy!). Henry’s Heart leads him to the best gift ever—woof woof!


The Boy Kings
by Katherine Losse

Kate Losse was a grad school refugee when she joined Facebook as employee #51 in 2005. Hired to answer user questions such as “What is a poke?” and “Why can’t I access my ex-girlfriend’s profile?” her early days at the company were characterized by a sense of camaraderie, promise, and ambition: Here was a group of scrappy young upstarts on a mission to rock Silicon Valley and change the world.

Over time, this sense of mission became so intense that working for Facebook felt like more than just a job; it implied a wholehearted dedication to “the cause.” Employees were incentivized to live within one mile of the office, summers were spent carousing at the company pool house, and female employees were told to wear T-shirts with founder Mark Zuckerberg’s profile picture on his birthday. Losse started to wonder what this new medium meant for real-life relationships: Would Facebook improve our social interactions? Or would we all just adapt our behavior to the habits and rules of these brilliant but socially awkward Internet savants who have become today’s youngest power players? Increasingly skeptical, Losse graduated from customer service to the internationalization team—tasked with rolling out Facebook to the rest of the world— finally landing a seat right outside Zuckerberg’s office as his personal ghostwriter, the voice of the boy king.

This book takes us for the first time into the heart of this fast-growing information empire, inviting us to high-level meetings with Zuckerberg; lifting the veil on long nights of relentless hacking and trolling; taking us behind the scenes of raucous company parties; and introducing us to the personalities, values, and secret ambitions of the floppy-haired boy wonders who are redefining the way we live, love, and work. By revealing here what’s really driving both the business and the culture of the social network, Losse answers the biggest question of all: What kind of world is Facebook trying to build, and is it the world we want to live in?

***

“Logging on to Facebook that first day, in retrospect, was the second, and to date the last, time that any technology has captured my imagination. The first was when Apple advertised the first laptop, the PowerBook, in the 1990s—with the words, ‘What’s on your PowerBook?’

“‘World domination,’ my teenaged self- answered instinctively. That’s what these devices were made for, I thought: so small and yet so powerful, so capable of linking quickly to and between everything else in the world. From the laptop, I could write and distribute information faster than ever before. It was intoxicating to imagine, and Facebook’s sudden, faithful rendering in 2004 of the physical world into the virtual felt the same. What could you do, now that you could see and connect to everyone and everything, instantly?

“But what, also, could be diminished by such quick access? In the realm of ideas, it seemed easy: Who wouldn’t want to distribute and discuss ideas widely? However, in the realm of the personal, it seemed more complicated. What was the benefit of doing everything in public? Is information itself neutral, or do different types of information have different values, different levels of expectation of privacy, different implications for distribution and consumption? Should all information be shared equally quickly and without regard to my relationship to it? And, finally, and most important, as we ask whenever we begin a new relationship with anything, would this be good for me?”

— From the Introduction


The Boy with the Rainbow Heart
by William Mason

If you are looking for a children’s book that teaches acceptance to any child who may be feeling different, this book is for you! This is a children’s story about a young boy with a rainbow heart who turns the town of Gray into the town of Shine – through love, kindness, and by being himself. It is a book that teaches love and acceptance for all people – no matter what color your heart may shine!

The Boy Who Gave His Heart Away
by Cole Moreton

‘Gripping … so powerfully emotional that at times I had to put it down to wipe my eyes’Mail on Sunday ‘How do you say thank you to someone for giving you their heart? It is the greatest gift a person can ever give.’ Marc is a promising young footballers of 15, growing up in Scotland. A few hundred miles away in England, Martin is a fun-loving 16-year-old. Both are enjoying their summers when they are suddenly struck down by debilitating illnesses. Within days, the boys are close to death. Although their paths have never crossed, their fortunes are about to be bound in the most extraordinary, intimate way. One of them will die and in doing so, he will save the other’s life. This is a deeply powerful and dramatic story. It is extremely rare for the family of a donor to have any personal contact with the recipient of their loved one’s organ. Yet remarkably, the mothers of these two boys meet and become friends, enabling the extraordinary, bittersweet moment in which a mother who has lost her son meets the boy he saved. Reaching out and placing her palm flat against his chest, she feels the heart of her son beating away inside another. Her boy, the boy who gave his heart away.

A Boy After God’s Own Heart
by Jim George

Boys have a lot competing for their attention, and peer pressure can be tremendous-making it a challenge to encourage them toward the things of God and living the Christian life. Jim George helps young guys to understand why God is important in everything they do. And he teaches that the Bible has the answers for all the questions and issues they face as they grow older. Boys will learn…the value of honoring and respecting their parents; the keys to making right choices and decisions; how to choose the best kinds of friends and be a good friend; the benefits of taking school seriously and being responsible; and the need to follow after God by reading the Bible and spending time in prayer. This book includes discussion questions and interactive material, opening a whole new world for boys, pointing them in the right direction for becoming what God designed them to be.

The Boy with the Tiger’s Heart
by Linda Coggin

The call of the wild is powerfully realised in this thrillingly evocative modern day fable

A girl raised in the wild, a desperate race for freedom and a boy with a fiercely guarded secret…

When Nona’s guardian kills himself, she is immediately suspected of murdering him. In a world where nature and darkness are feared, where wild animals are held captive and cities are illuminated by permanent light, who will believe her innocence? Nona must flee with her only friend – a bear who is strangely human.

In their desperate attempt to escape capture, Nona and her bear encounter two strange boys, Caius and Jay. Together, the four of them will hide, and fight, and make the deadliest of enemies in their desperate race to a forbidden place called The Edge – where nature is unrestrained, where there is light and shade, forest and mountain, and where there are no shackles or boundaries.

A poetic, haunting and unforgettable modern fable about nature, society, and what it is that makes us human.


The Heart of a Boy = Cuore: A Story
by Edmondo de Amicis, Pedro J. Mantellini Gonzalez

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