Veil: Secret Wars Of The Cia

Veil
by Bob Woodward

Veilis the story of the covert wars that were waged in Central America, Iran and Libya in a secretive atmosphere and became the centerpieces and eventual time bombs of American foreign policy in the 1980s.

Bush At War
by Bob Woodward

With his unmatched investigative skill, Bob Woodward tells the behind-the-scenes story of how President George W. Bush and his top national security advisers led the nation to war. Extensive quotations from the secret deliberations of the National Security Council and firsthand revelations of the private thoughts, concerns and fears of the president and his war cabinet, make BUSH AT WAR an unprecedented chronicle of a modern presidency in a time of grave crisis.

Based on interviews with more than a hundred sources and four hours of exclusive interviews with the president, BUSH AT WAR reveals Bush’s sweeping, almost grandiose vision for remaking the world. Woodward’s virtual wiretap into the White House Situation Room reveals a stunning group portrait of an untested president and his advisers, three of whom might themselves have made it to the presidency.

In BUSH AT WAR, Bob Woodward once again delivers a reporting tour de force.


The Brethren
by Bob Woodward, Scott Armstrong

The Brethren is the first detailed behind-the-scenes account of the Supreme Court in action.

Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong have pierced its secrecy to give us an unprecedented view of the Chief and Associate Justices—maneuvering, arguing, politicking, compromising, and making decisions that affect every major area of American life.


The American Agent
by Richard L. Holm

Dick Holm joined the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1960s and rose rapidly through the ranks to become Bureau Chief in Paris, eventually earning the Distinguished Intelligence Medal, the CIA’s highest award. His first posting was in Laos, where he served in the CIA’s “Secret War” against the Communists in the lead-up to the Vietnam War. He was then sent to the Congo and suffered near-fatal injuries after a plane crash in a remote jungle. Healed by local tribesmen, his horrific burns treated with snake oil and tree bark, he then spent two years in a U.S. hospital undergoing extensive surgery. Holm also worked in Hong Kong and Paris and was instrumental in anti-terrorism operations during Carlos the Jackal’s international terror campaign. Having served under 13 CIA directors, Holm has firm, highly informed views on the policies—past and present, national and international—that determine how, where, and why the CIA works.

Tragic Mountains
by Jane Hamilton-Merritt

This is an important story, little acknowledged–let alone reported–in the world press. Highly recommended.” –Library Journal

In this important work, Dr. Jane Hamilton-Merritt traces the support rendered to the United States by the Hmong people of Laos during the decades-long struggle for the soul of Indochina which we speciously call the Vietnam War. The result of fourteen years of meticulous research, Hamilton-Merritt’s book pushes back the veil of official secrecy which has so long surrounded so much of the “secret war” in Laos.” –Journal of American History

It is an impressive work, product of an enormous amount of research. The author is to be commended both for her dedication and her contribution to scholarship.” –Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California

Tragic Mountains is a compelling read, a fine journalist’s contribution to a little-known facet of America’s Vietnam War, as well as her appeal to the American conscience to honour what she passionately believes to be her country’s moral obligation to its former Hmong allies in highland Laos.” –Journal of Southeast Asian Studies

I have read and reviewed hundreds of books on the Indochina wars, but few have had the impact of this seminal work, which vividly depicts the abandonment, betrayal, and attempted genocide of a proud and courageous people.” –Infantry

Tragic Mountains is not only a fair and accurate account of the experiences of [the Hmong], it is an engrossing tale of humanity under conditions of danger, heroism, and eventual defeat.” –William E. Colby, former director of the Central Intelligence Agency

Tragic Mountains tells the story of the Hmong’s struggle for freedom and survival in Laos from 1942 through 1992. During those years, most Hmong sided with the French against the Japanese and Ho Chi Minh’s Viet Minh, and then with the Americans against the North Vietnamese.

This is a story of courage, tenacity, brutality, secrecy, incredible h


Plan of Attack
by Bob Woodward

Award-winning journalist Bob Woodward has spent over thirty years in Washington’s corridors of power. In All the President’s Men it was he, together with Carl Bernstein, who exposed the Watergate scandal and he has been giving us a privileged front-row seat to White-House intrigue and decision-making ever since.

With PLAN OF ATTACK he brings his investigative skills to bear on the administration of George W. Bush, and the build-up to war in Iraq. What emerges is a fascinating and intimate portrait of the leading powers in Bush’s war council and their allies overseas as they prepare their pre-emptive attack and change the course of history.


Back fire
by Roger Warner

Documenting the secret war the United States waged in Laos from 1960 to 1973, an account reveals guerrilla raids, warring princes, and a CIA operative who raised an army in a series of events that led to the Vietnam War. 20,000 first printing.

The President’s Book of Secrets
by David Priess

Every president has had a unique and complicated relationship with the intelligence community. While some have been coolly distant, even adversarial, others have found their intelligence agencies to be among the most valuable instruments of policy and power.

Since John F. Kennedy’s presidency, this relationship has been distilled into a personalized daily report: a short summary of what the intelligence apparatus considers the most crucial information for the president to know that day about global threats and opportunities. This top–secret document is known as the President’s Daily Brief, or, within national security circles, simply “the Book.” Presidents have spent anywhere from a few moments (Richard Nixon) to a healthy part of their day (George W. Bush) consumed by its contents; some (Bill Clinton and George H. W. Bush) consider it far and away the most important document they saw on a regular basis while commander in chief.

The details of most PDBs are highly classified, and will remain so for many years. But the process by which the intelligence community develops and presents the Book is a fascinating look into the operation of power at the highest levels. David Priess, a former intelligence officer and daily briefer, has interviewed every living president and vice president as well as more than one hundred others intimately involved with the production and delivery of the president’s book of secrets. He offers an unprecedented window into the decision making of every president from Kennedy to Obama, with many character–rich stories revealed here for the first time.


A Question of Torture
by Alfred McCoy

A startling exposé of the CIA’s development and spread of psychological torture, from the Cold War to Abu Ghraib and beyond

In this revelatory account of the CIA’s secret, fifty-year effort to develop new forms of torture, historian Alfred W. McCoy uncovers the deep, disturbing roots of recent scandals at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo. Far from aberrations, as the White House has claimed, A Question of Torture shows that these abuses are the product of a long-standing covert program of interrogation.
Developed at the cost of billions of dollars, the CIA’s method combined “sensory deprivation” and “self-inflicted pain” to create a revolutionary psychological approach—the first innovation in torture in centuries. The simple techniques—involving isolation, hooding, hours of standing, extremes of hot and cold, and manipulation of time—constitute an all-out assault on the victim’s senses, destroying the basis of personal identity. McCoy follows the years of research—which, he reveals, compromised universities and the U.S. Army—and the method’s dissemination, from Vietnam through Iran to Central America. He traces how after 9/11 torture became Washington’s weapon of choice in both the CIA’s global prisons and in “torture-friendly” countries to which detainees are dispatched. Finally McCoy argues that information extracted by coercion is worthless, making a case for the legal approach favored by the FBI.
Scrupulously documented and grippingly told, A Question of Torture is a devastating indictment of inhumane practices that have spread throughout the intelligence system, damaging American’s laws, military, and international standing.



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