Men’s Fashion

History of Men’s Fashion
by Nicholas Storey

Everything you ever wanted to know about men’s clothing – and so much more – from the exact hour Nelson lost his right eye to the type of palm needed for a Panama hat, what Cary Grant’s tailor had to do to his shoulders – and those all-important questions of what to where, when and why, including when to wear a bow tie (surely ‘never’ is the only answer?). A quirky book full of facts that you never realised you needed to know, including the exact thickness of animal hair used to create must-have fashion items, including suits. Provocative, and controversial at times – but always very well dressed.

Menswear Revolution
by Jay McCauley Bowstead

In recent years, menswear has moved decisively center stage. Menswear Revolution investigates the transformation of men’s fashion through the lens of shifting masculinities, examining how its increasing diversity has created new ways for men to explore and express their identities. Harnessing sustained market growth and creative dynamism on the runway, ground-breaking designers from Raf Simons and Hedi Slimane to Craig Green have revolutionized the discipline with their bold re-imaginings of the male wardrobe.

Analysing the role of the media in shaping attitudes to men’s fashion, Menswear Revolution studies how competing narratives of masculinity are reflected in popular discourse. Taking us from the mod and peacock revolutions of the 1960s to the new wave aesthetics of the 1980s, the book explores historical precedents for today’s menswear scene – and looks at the evolution of the ‘ideal’ male body, from the muscular to the lean and boyish.

Combining interviews with fashion professionals with close analyses of garments and advertising, Menswear Revolution provides an authoritative account of menswear design today. Highlighting its relationship to changing concepts of gender, the book provides a much-needed update to scholarship on masculinity, fashion and the body.


ABC of Men’s Fashion
by Hardy Amies

“A man should look as if he has bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care, and then forgotten all about them.” For all men—and indeed all women who are interested in men’s clothes—here is an alphabetical guide to men’s fashion written with wit and expert knowledge. From the etiquette of dressing for all occasions to the meaning of technical terms, Hardy Amies’s skillful eye guides you safely through style decisions on everything from blazers and brogues to skiing and sandals. No man can afford to be without this classic style bible. EXHIBITION SCHEDULE: Victoria and Albert Museum, London, September 22, 2007–January 6, 2008 ”There’s no such thing as adesigner of menswear-—it’s only history. The suit around the world is based on the english suit, which began in about 1670. Any man, whether he’s american, japanese, french or whatever, who wants to be seriously well dressed, looks to theenglishman’s suitfor how to achieve it.”—fromabc of men’s fashion

Men’s Fashion Illustrations from the Turn of the Century
by Mitchell Co., Jean L. Druesedow

Over 100 full-page, royalty-free illustrations document what well-dressed American men wore in early 1900s: checked and striped business suits, sporty knickers and jackets, elegant formal wear, long fur-trimmed coats, more. Includes variety of accessories: canes, gloves, spats.

Men in the Mirror
by Tim Edwards

In recent decades, the myth of fashionable women and sartorially challenged men has been overturned not least through the proliferation of men’s style magazines such as GQ and the emergence of masculinity as a marketing tool. In this engaging book, Edwards applies a sociological approach to our understanding of men’s fashion, which he argues is significant in the nexus of masculinity and society, past and present, rather than a narrow artistic or aesthetic interest.

Rejecting an essentialist or ‘natural’ origin, Edwards explores how masculinity and men’s fashion are constructed, particularly in relation to consumer society. It is the growing commodification and aestheticism of everyday life, alongside developments in marketing and advertising, that Edwards identifies as the catalyst in the emergence of men’s fashion, rather than an abstract ‘crisis of masculinity’ or ‘new man’ identity. Concurrently, in the 1980s, changes in demography, economics and ideology gave certain men greater freedom and spending power than ever before. Edwards investigates how these men, clearly distinguished by age, class and sexual orientation, were seduced by advertisers with sexualised images of suited city gents and body-beautiful boys in Levis, and how the resultant process of consumption was facilitated through developments in the practice of shopping itself, such as easy access to credit. He examines the influence of the advertisers’ message in creating a hierarchy of masculinity in which some men are valorised and others are denigrated.

Starting with a historical review of men’s fashion and a discussion of its importance and meanings, Edwards goes on to analyse the contemporary marketing of menswear and masculinity in advertising and in the media, and considers the politics of fashion for men in terms of gender, class, race and sexuality.


A History of Men’s Fashion
by Farid Chenoune

A History of Men’s Fashion is divided into four parts that follow the sartorial evolution of the male wardrobe from the era of Beau Brummell, which created the model of the gentlemen and the dandy, to the “anti-fashion” trends of the early 1990s.

Part One (1760-1850) traces the era of tails and the frock coat, the emergence of the pantaloon and the influence of Anglomania on European fashion. Men’s fashion in Europe’s fin de siecle climate, and the impact of ready-made garments are discussed in Part Two (1850-1914). Part Three (1914-1940) introduces the aesthetic of the sweater and the variations on the suit and vest as part of the post-World War I moral liberation and economic euphoria, and traces changes all the way through to the New Deal and the new American elegance. The post-World War II fashion revolution is described in Part Four (1940-1990) from zoot suits, spurred by the black American jazz scene, to London’s Mod fashion of the 60s, Pierre Cardin and the new French style, the emergence of Italian chic, and the hippie and punk styles of the 70s. The book is completed by a perceptive discussion of contemporary designers such as Jean-Paul Gaultier, Giorgio Armani, Ralph Lauren, Comme des Garcons, and Yohji Yamamoto.

Farid Chenoune’s lively and accessible text is filled with amusing anecdotes about male dress and grooming. He vividly places style transformations in the context of contemporary fashion criticism, history, social etiquette, manufacturing and marketing revolutions, and highlights public and private responses to fashion trends. By analyzing fashion’s symbolic, social, and economic frames of reference he lays before us the entire fabric of the intellectual, spiritual, and material forces of the modern era. The copious illustrations for this book, many reproduced here for the first time, are drawn from fashion designs, paintings, drawings, cartoons, tailor’s model books, magazines, and rare, impromptu photographs of masculine style in city streets.


The Men’s Fashion Reader
by Peter McNeil, Vicki Karaminas

The Men’s Fashion Reader brings together key writings in the history, culture and identity of men’s fashion. The readings provide a balanced range of important methodological approaches, primary research and significant case studies. The book is organized into thematic sections covering topics such as history, theory, subculture, iconic items of clothing, consumption and the media.

Each section is introduced and concludes with an annotated guide to further reading. With exciting illustrations of men’s dress from a range of historical periods, and including readings from key scholars and new writers across a wide range of fields, The Men’s Fashion Reader is the essential introduction to the subject. Introduction: The Field of Men’s Fashion Part 1. A History of Men’s Fashion Part 2. Masculinity and Sexuality Part 3. Icons: The Evolution of Men’s Wear Part 4. Subculture Part 5. Consuming and Creating Style Conclusion



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