Online Library Archive

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
by Sherman Alexie

Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.

Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.

With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.


EdPsych Modules
by Cheryl Cisero Durwin, Marla Reese-Weber

Now with SAGE Publications, Cheryl Cisero Durwin and Marla Reese-Weber’s EdPsych Modules uses an innovative implementation of case studies and a modular format to address the challenge of effectively connecting theory and research to practice. Each module is a succinct, stand-alone topic that represents every subject found in traditional chapter texts and can be used in any order for maximum flexibility in organizing your course. Each of the book’s eight units of modules begins with a set of four case studies–early childhood, elementary, middle school, and secondary–and ends with “Assess” and “Reflect and Evaluate” questions and activities to encourage comprehension and application of the research and theories presented. The case approach and the extensive pedagogy that support it allows students to constantly see the applications of the theories and research that they are studying in the text.


Digital Preservation for Libraries, Archives, and Museums
by Edward M. Corrado, Heather Moulaison Sandy

Digital Preservation in Libraries, Archives, and Museums represents a new approach to getting started with digital preservation: that of what cultural heritage professionals need to know as they begin their work. For administrators and practitioners alike, the information in this book is presented readably, focusing on management issues and best practices. Although this book addresses technology, it is not solely focused on technology. After all, technology changes and digital preservation is aimed for the long term. This is not a how-to book giving step-by-step processes for certain materials in a given kind of system. Instead, it addresses a broad group of resources that could be housed in any number of digital preservation systems. Finally, this book is about “things (not technology; not how-to; not theory) I wish I knew before I got started.”

Digital preservation is concerned with the life cycle of the digital object in a robust and all-inclusive way. Many Europeans and some North Americans may refer to digital curation to mean the same thing, taking digital preservation to be the very limited steps and processes needed to insure access over the long term. The authors take digital preservation in the broadest sense of the term: looking at all aspects of curating and preserving digital content for long term access.
The book is divided into four parts based on the Digital Preservation Triad:

  1. Situating Digital Preservation,
  2. Management Aspects,
  3. Technology Aspects, and
  4. Content-Related Aspects.

The book includes a foreword by Michael Lesk, eminent scholar and forerunner in digital librarianship and preservation. The book features an appendix providing additional information and resources for digital preservationists. Finally, there is a glossary to support a clear understanding of the terms presented in the book.
Digital Preservation will answer questions that you might not have even known you had, leading to more successful digital preservation initiatives.


Creating a Winning Online Exhibition
by Martin R. Kalfatovic

It’s no secret that well-executed exhibits in libraries and museums can make attendance numbers skyrocket. Dynamic exhibits not only provide information and entertainment for your existing customers, but they are also opportunities to reach out to new customers and to widen your market. A great exhibit can be the hook that brings people in the door for the first time. Creating a Winning Online Exhibition will help you to do just that – conceive, design, and execute a compelling online exhibition. Different than a digital collection, an online exhibition is a selective presentation of objects organized around a thematic and narrative structure. Digital librarian Martin Kalfatovic takes you through the process of developing an exhibit that will attract users, increase your visibility, and showcase your collection and services. With case studies of successful online exhibitions, sample artwork and screen shots, up-to-date information on mark-up languages such as HTML and XML, and discussion of online databases and software programs, you will be equipped with all you need to pull off a winning exhibition. Also included are helpful samples of: * Project proposals * Exhibition scripts *

Virtual Slavica
by Michael Neubert

Get an inside view of producing digital information projects

Digital technology has provided great opportunities as well as colossal challenges for information professionals at Slavic libraries, collections, and archives. Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives presents leading information experts exploring the monumental task of converting Slavic manuscripts and books for presentation in the digital realm. Readers get a clear inside view of how to conquer the various challenges that arise within digital library and archive projects through detailed descriptions of specific projects discussed in easy-to-understand language.

Slavic studies present innate problems when attempts are made to allow access to the material over the Internet. The Cyrillic alphabet is just one of the huge stumbling blocks standing in the way of universal access to this important material. Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives provides practical strategies for anyone looking for answers to problems within their own virtual information project. Copyright issues, digital reference, text encoding, online translation, presentation issues, and use of grant funding are some the topics comprehensively discussed to give information professionals clear solutions to the issues they may be facing. The book is carefully referenced.

Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives examines:

  • the persistence of multiple standards for digitally handling the Cyrillic alphabet
  • presenting the Comintern archives online
  • FEB-web—its structure, the creation of digital editions, its plans for the future
  • copyright issues in the twenty-first century
  • Meeting of Frontiers—the reorganization of the text content of the international collaborative digital library project at the Library of Congress
  • standardized encoding
  • practical and theoretical programming issues
  • the unforeseen difficulties—and solutions—to complete a grant-funded digital Slavic project
  • and more

Virtual Slavica: Digital Libraries, Digital Archives is of keen interest to librarians, archivists, Slavic studies academics, and library and information science educators and students.


Digital Archives
by Gabriella Ivacs

This landmark edited collection offers a wide-ranging overview of how rapid technological changes and the push for providing wide access to digitized cultural heritage holdings are changing the landscape of archives.
This book provides a set of inspirational and informative chapters from international experts, which will help the readers understand the drivers for change in archives and their implications. Reassessment of the role of archives in the digital environment will serve to develop critical approaches to current trends in the broader heritage sector, including cultural industries experimenting with sustainable business models for cultural production, digitization of analogue cultural heritage, and the related IPR issues surrounding the re-use of digital objects and data for research, education, advocacy and art. Contributors also present state-of-the-art solutions in building digital archives on networked infrastructure, trusted digital repositories to ensure long-term access, and tools to serve emerging needs in digital humanities.
Readership: Digital archivists and practitioners involved in the design and support of digital archives; professionals and researchers involved in projects working with digital archival materials; students in library, information and archive studies.

Libraries, Archives, and Museums Today
by Peter Botticelli, Martha R. Mahard, Michèle V. Cloonan

This book offers insights into changes brought about by the enormous growth of the internet. There are new ways to share cultural heritage materials through online finding aids, exhibits, and other initiatives. What has been accomplished across libraries, archives, and museums? The authors consider that question by using case studies to explore activities in 14 libraries, archives, museums, and other heritage organizations. They consider what we can learn from current collaborations within and across libraries, archives, and museums and why some collaborations are successful while others cannot be sustained. Their findings are based on observations and interviews at institutions and organizations in the United States, Australia, and the U.K.

These organizations have worked to make their collections accessible. Some have simply digitized their collections, while others have enhanced their collection management systems. Others have incorporated digital asset management systems to organize and retrieve media, and to manage digital rights and permissions. Most of these institutions and organizations have succeeded through strategic partnerships, strategic planning, and insightful leadership. However, the book also contains examples of institutions that have undergone transitions: one of the museums closed, and another closed its library. Taken together, the fourteen institutions shed light on professional practices today.


World Guide to Library, Archive and Information Science Education
by Axel Schniederjürgen

This directory lists education institutions world-wide where professional education and training programmes in the field of library, archive and information science are carried out at a tertiary level of education or higher.

More than ten years after the publication of the last edition, this up-to-date reference source includes more than 900 universities and other institutions, and more than 1.500 relevant programmes. Entries provide contact information as well as details such as statistical information, tuition fees, admission requirements, programmes’ contents.


Archives and the Digital Library
by William E. Landis, Robin L. Chandler

Technological advances and innovative perspectives constantly evolve the notion of what makes up a digital library. Archives and the Digital Library provides an insightful snapshot of the current state of archiving in the digital realm. Respected experts in library and information science present the latest research results and illuminating case studies to provide a comprehensive glimpse at the theory, technological advances, and unique approaches to digital information management as it now stands. The book focuses on digitally reformatted surrogates of non-digital textual and graphic materials from archival collections, exploring the roles archivists can play in broadening the scope of digitization efforts through creatively developing policies, procedures, and tools to effectively manage digital content.

Many of the important advances in digitization of materials have little to do with the efforts of archivists. Archives and the Digital Library concentrates specifically on the developments in the world of archives and the digitization of the unique content of information resources archivists deal with on a constant basis. This resource reviews the current issues and challenges, effective user assessment techniques, various digital resources projects, collaboration strategies, and helpful best practices. The book is extensively referenced and includes helpful illustrative figures.

Topics in Archives and the Digital Library include:

  • a case study of LSTA-grant funded California Local History Digital Resources Project
  • expanding the scope of traditional archival digitations projects beyond the limits of a single institution
  • a case study of the California Cultures Project
  • the top ten themes in usability issues
  • case studies of usability studies, focus groups, interviews, ethnographic studies, and web log analysis
  • developing a reciprocal partnership with a digital library
  • the technical challenges in harvesting and managing Web archives
  • metadata strategies to provide descriptive, technical, and preservation related information about archived Web sites
  • long-term preservation of digital materials
  • building a trusted digital repository
  • collaboration in developing and supporting the technical and organizational infrastructure for sustainability in both academic and state government
  • the Archivists’ Toolkit software application

Archives and the Digital Library is timely, important reading for archivists, librarians, library administrators, library information educators, archival educators, and students.



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