Online Library Games

Handbook of Digital Games
by Marios C. Angelides, Harry Agius

This book covers the state-of-the-art in digital games research and development for anyone working with or studying digital games and those who are considering entering into this rapidly growing industry. Many books have been published that sufficiently describe popular topics in digital games; however, until now there has not been a comprehensive book that draws the traditional and emerging facets of gaming together across multiple disciplines within a single volume.

Games with a Purpose (GWAPS)
by Mathieu Lafourcade, Alain Joubert, Nathalie Le Brun

Human brains can be seen as knowledge processors in a distributed system. Each of them can achieve, conscious or not, a small part of a treatment too important to be done by one. These are also “hunter / gatherers” of knowledge. Provided that the number of contributors is large enough, the results are usually better quality than if they were the result of the activity of a single person, even if it is a domain expert. This type of activity is done via online games.


Libraries Got Game
by Brian Mayer, Christopher Harris

A much-talked-about topic gets thorough consideration from two educator-librarians, who explain exactly how designer board gameswhich are worlds apart from games produced strictly for the educational market can become curricular staples for students young and old.

E-Learning and the Academic Library
by Scott Rice, Margaret N. Gregor

Focusing on academic libraries and librarians who are extending the boundaries of e-learning, this collection of essays presents new ways of using information and communication technologies to create learning experiences for a variety of user communities. Essays feature e-learning projects involving MOOCs (massive open online courses), augmented reality, chatbots and other innovative applications. Contributors describe the process of project development, from determination of need, to exploration of tools, project design and user assessment.

Designing Online Information Literacy Games Students Want to Play
by Karen Markey, Chris Leeder, Soo Young Rieh

Designing Online Information Literacy Games Students Want to Play sets the record straight with regard to the promise of games for motivating and teaching students in educational environments.

The authors draw on their experience designing the BiblioBouts information literacy game, deploying it in dozens of college classrooms across the country, and evaluating its effectiveness for teaching students how to conduct library research. The multi-modal evaluation of BiblioBouts involved qualitative and quantitative data collection methods and analyses. Drawing on the evaluation, the authors describe how students played this particular information literacy game and make recommendations for the design of future information literacy games.

You’ll learn how the game’s design evolved in response to student input and how students played the game including their attitudes about playing games to develop information literacy skills and concepts specifically and playing educational games generally. The authors describe how students benefited as a result of playing the game.

Drawing from their own first-hand experience, research, and networking, the authors feature best practices that educators and game designers in LIS specifically and other educational fields generally need to know so that they build classroom games that students want to play. Best practices topics covered include pre-game instruction, rewards, feedback, the ability to review/change actions, ideal timing, and more.

The final section of the book covers important concepts for future information literacy game design.


Game Invaders
by Clive Fencott, Jo Clay, Mike Lockyer, Paul Massey

Presenting a holistic and thoroughly practical investigation of the true nature of computer games that arms readers with a small yet powerful set of theories for developing unique approaches to understanding games. Game Invaders fully integrates genre theory, new media aesthetics, perceptual opportunities, and semiotics into a practical DIY toolkit for games analysis—offering detailed guidance for how to conduct in-depth critiques of game content and gameplay.

Featuring an informal and witty writing style, the book devotes a number of chapters to specific games from all eras, clearly demonstrating the practical application of the theories to modern, large-scale computer games. Readers will find:

• Suggestions on how to apply the DIY package to major issues central to understanding computer games and their design • Coverage of the semiotics of video games, laying the foundation for such topics as the role of agency and virtual storytelling • Tasks and solutions for readers wishing to practice techniques introduced in the book • A companion website featuring access to an app that enables the reader to conduct their own activity profiling of games

An important resource for those wishing to dig deeper into the games they design, Game Invaders gives game designers the skills they need to stand out from the crowd. It is also a valuable guide for anyone wishing to learn more about computer games, virtual reality, and new media.


Networking and Online Games
by Grenville Armitage, Mark Claypool, Philip Branch

The computer game industry is clearly growing in the direction of multiplayer, online games. Understanding the demands of games on IP (Internet Protocol) networks is essential for ISP (Internet Service Provider) engineers to develop appropriate IP services. Correspondingly, knowledge of the underlying network’s capabilities is vital for game developers.

Networking and Online Games concisely draws together and illustrates the overlapping and interacting technical concerns of these sectors. The text explains the principles behind modern multiplayer communication systems and the techniques underlying contemporary networked games. The traffic patterns that modern games impose on networks, and how network performance and service level limitations impact on game designers and player experiences, are covered in-depth, giving the reader the knowledge necessary to develop better gaming products and network services. Examples of real-world multiplayer online games illustrate the theory throughout.

Networking and Online Games:

  • Provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge guide to the development and service provision needs of online, networked games.
  • Contrasts the considerations of ISPs (e.g. predicting traffic loads) with those of game developers (e.g. sources of lag/jitter), clarifying coinciding requirements.
  • Explains how different technologies such as cable, ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) and wireless, etc., affect online game-play experience, and how different game styles impose varying traffic dynamics and requirements on the network.
  • Discusses future directions brought by emerging technologies such as UMTS (Universal Mobile Telephone Service), GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), Wireless LANs, IP service Quality, and NAPT/NAT (Network Address Port Translation/Network Address Translation)
  • Illustrates the concepts using high-level examples of existing multiplayer online games (such as Quake III Arena, Wolfenstein Enemy Territory, and Half-Life 2).

Networking and Online Games will be an invaluable resource for games developers, engineers and technicians at Internet Service Providers, as well as advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Multimedia Engineering.


A Brief History of the Olympic Games
by David C. Young

For more than a millennium, the ancient Olympics captured the imaginations of the Greeks, until a Christianized Rome terminated the competitions in the fourth century AD. But the Olympic ideal did not die and this book is a succinct history of the ancient Olympics and their modern resurgence.

Classics professor David Young, who has researched the subject for over 25 years, reveals how the ancient Olympics evolved from modest beginnings into a grand festival, attracting hundreds of highly trained athletes, tens of thousands of spectators, and the finest artists and poets.


A Companion to J. R. R. Tolkien
by Stuart D. Lee

This is a complete resource for scholars and students of Tolkien, as well as avid fans, with coverage of his life, work, dominant themes, influences, and the critical reaction to his writing.

  • An in-depth examination of Tolkien’s entire work by a cadre of top scholars
  • Provides up-to-date discussion and analysis of Tolkien’s scholarly and literary works, including his latest posthumous book, The Fall of Arthur, as well as addressing contemporary adaptations, including the new Hobbit films
  • Investigates various themes across his body of work, such as mythmaking, medieval languages, nature, war, religion, and the defeat of evil
  • Discusses the impact of his work on art, film, music, gaming, and subsequent generations of fantasy writers

50 Digital Team-Building Games
by John Chen

Use technology to increase loyalty and productivity in your employees

50 Digital Team-Building Games offers fun, energizing meeting openers, team activities, and group adventures for business teams, using Twitter, GPS, Facebook, smartphones, and other technology. The games can be played in-person or virtually, and range from 5-minute ice-breakers to an epic four-hour GPS-based adventure. Designed to be lead by managers, facilitators, presenters, and speakers, the activities help teams and groups get comfortable with technology, get to know each other better, build trust, improve communication, and more. No need to be a “techie” to lead these games—they’re simple and well-scripted.

Author John Chen is the CEO of Geoteaming, a company that uses technology and adventure to teach teams how to collaborate.

  • How to lead a simple, fast, fun team building activity with easy-to-follow instructions
  • How to create successful “virtual” team building that requires NO travel and little to no additional expenses
  • How to engage standoffish engineers, “hard to reach” technical teams, or Gen X/Y teammates with technology they enjoy using

Successful technology-based team building can build buzz for your company, build critically important relationships and communication internally, and keep your team talking about it for weeks afterward!



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