Online Library Help

Library Technology and Digital Resources
by Marie Keen Shaw

In the last decade library collections have rapidly evolved from a predominance of print books and journals to an ever growing mix of digital and print resources. Library patrons are predominately served by support staff that is expected to know how to help patrons select and use digital resources. Yet most library support staff (LSS) has not had training to become proficient in finding, using, and instructing others in the abundance of the digital resources of websites, databases, e-texts, digital libraries and their related technologies.

Library Technology and Digital Resources: An Introduction for Support Staff is both a text for professors who teach in library support staff programs and an introductory reference manual for support staff who work in libraries. This book will guide the LSS to be able to:

  • Distinguish key features and enhancements found among vendors and providers of digital libraries, digital collections, databases, and e-texts;
  • Plan, budget, fund and write grants for digital resources;
  • Understand the complexity and options of licensing and usage agreements for digital resources;
  • Know copyright permissions and acceptable use guidelines for digital resources.
  • Understand the basic technologies that support library digital resources including network structures, software applications, and protocols;
  • Distinguish between directories and search engines as they relate to digital resources as well as be able to employ advance search skills effectively;
  • Explore the resources of global, national, and state digital libraries and their collections;
  • Use government databases and other digitized systems and information sources;
  • Find exemplary digital resources though other agencies such as museums, university collections and other sources that librarians can share with patrons.
  • Create local digital resources of primary and historical materials and artifacts with metadata and cataloging for searchable access.
  • Interpret meaning from library digital resources using visual literacy skills.
  • Promote library digital resources through a variety of means including social media and online options.

Leading from the Library
by McClintock Miller Shannon, William Bass

The modern school library supports education in a variety of ways. One essential role librarians play is that of a leader who works collaboratively to build relationships, mold culture and climate, and advocate for the needs of students and the community. In this book, a librarian and an education leader team up to reflect on the librarian’s ability to build connections in two ways. First, they discuss the benefits of bringing the outside world into the library through the use of social media, videoconferencing and other tools that allow librarians to partner with others. Then they expand upon these connections by addressing how librarians can lead in the greater educational community by sharing resources and strategies, and partnering with school leaders to tell the story of the school community. Through this book, librarians will discover the influence they can have on the school community as the library becomes the heart of the school, a place where problems are solved, content is explored, connections are made and discovery happens.

Internet Reference Support for Distance Learners
by Rita Pellen, William Miller

Make separate library services for distance learners a thing of the past

Internet Reference Support for Distance Learners takes a comprehensive look at efforts by librarians and information specialists to provide distance learners with effective services that match those already available on campus. With the development of the World Wide Web and the evolution of Web-based services, reference librarians are adding a human element to the virtual library, blurring the difference between distance learners and traditional users. This unique book examines how they deal with a wide range of related topics, including standards and guidelines, copyright issues, streaming media, and chat and digital references, and presents a historical overview of how reference and instructional services have been delivered to distance users—before and after the creation of the Internet.
Internet Reference Support for Distance Learners reveals that librarians do not make a sharp distinction between reference and instruction within the context of distance learning, and that there is no clear boundary between “true” distance learners and more traditional students who might use services designed for nontraditional users. Online capabilities have allowed reference librarians to approximate services advocated by published guidelines and standards, including the ACRL Distance Learning Section’s Guidelines for Distance Learning Library Services, to provide a framework for librarians to plan services for off-campus students.

Internet Reference Support for Distance Learners provides practical information on:

  • how librarians can “keep IT simple” when designing methods to access reference support
  • why library Web sites are vital sources of communication between the distance learning student and the reference-based instructional component
  • how to set up a university chat service, including software selection, staff training and assessment
  • how to provide students services beyond traditional provision of resources, including advising, enrollment, and payment of fees
  • how to create an online assistance site that incorporates online versions of traditional print handouts, FAQs, subject guides, course-specific guides, learning modules, and instructional videos in one central location
  • how to work with faculty to create online support for students in Blackboard courses
  • the pros and cons of using open-source software
  • how to create an online library assistance site
  • how to create online information literacy course to teach independent research skills to remote students
  • how to avoid copyright infringement and how to educate library personnel about copyright law
  • how to use Camtasia Studio, a screen capture program to create audio and video for online presentations

Internet Reference Support for Distance Learners is an invaluable resource for librarians working in academic, school, special, and public settings, and for library science faculty and students.


Homework Help from the Library
by Carol F. Intner

This straightforward handbook is filled with nuts-and-bolts advice on the best ways to help young people with their homework, no matter what the assignment. Intner, a certified English teacher and experienced tutor, concentrates on the practical covering * How students’ different learning styles and current technology inform the homework process *Staff training and community outreach *Options for working more closely with both students and teachers From planning a customized homework-help agenda to demonstrating how to help students successfully use their technological savvy in ways not necessarily possible at home, this book presents a no-nonsense, comprehensive approach to giving students the assistance they need.

The World Book Encyclopedia
by

– More than 27,500 rich photographs and illustrations and comprehensive, highly readable text appeal to a broad range of readers.
– More than 3,800 expert contributors collaborate with our editors and researchers to ensure that articles are accurate and reflect current scholarship.
– World Book revision rates make it the most current and up-to-date encyclopedia available.
– More than 65 new and 3,000 revised articles.
– Highlighting the 2008 edition are new and expanded articles on electronic games, Google, Inc., George Clooney, and Maria Sharapova, among many others.

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science, Second Edition –
by Miriam Drake

A revitalized version of the popular classic, the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science, Second Edition targets new and dynamic movements in the distribution, acquisition, and development of print and online media-compiling articles from more than 450 information specialists on topics including program planning in the digital era, recruitment, information management, advances in digital technology and encoding, intellectual property, and hardware, software, database selection and design, competitive intelligence, electronic records preservation, decision support systems, ethical issues in information, online library instruction, telecommuting, and digital library projects.

Building the Knowledge Society on the Internet: Sharing and Exchanging Knowledge in Networked Environments
by Bolisani, Ettore

In today’s networked societies, a key factor of the social and economic success is the capability to exchange, transfer, and share knowledge. In the wide-ranging area of knowledge management, the issue of knowledge exchange in networked environments emerges in several application fields, and is treated with different approaches.

Building the Knowledge Society on the Internet: Sharing and Exchanging Knowledge in Networked Environments proposes a vast panorama of research on the topic while presenting a variety of viewpoints, approaches, and indications of the shared elements intended as the foundations of an emerging and fascinating multidisciplinary field.


The Transforming Public Library Technology Infrastructure
by Ala Office for Research and Statistics

Library Technology Reports August/September 2011 vol. 47 / no.6 This issue of Library Technology Reports, conceived and coordinated by the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Research and Statistics, focuses on the evolution and current state of public-access technologies in public libraries from the infrastructure, services, and resources perspectives. This issue brings together longitudinal data, key issues, trends, and best practices that will provide library staff with tools for planning, advocacy, and service enhancements. A number of prominent library professionals contributed their expertise to this issue. Authors and topics include John carlo Bertot, Paul T. Jaeger, Emily E. Wahl, and Kathryn I. Sigler on Public Libraries and the Internet: An Evolutionary Perspective; Nicole D. Alemanne, Lauren H. Mandel, and Charles R. McClure on The Rural Public Library as Leader in Community Broadband Services; Robert A. Caluori, Jr. on Successfully Planning a Scalable and Effective Patron Wireless Network; Nancy Fredericks on E-Government and Employment Support Services; Larra Clark and Marijke Visser on Digital Literacy; and Stephanie Gerding on Transforming Public Library Patron Technology Training.

Modern Library Technology and Reference Services
by Samuel T. Huang

Develop improved reference services to keep up with the rapid technological changes in academic libraries with the help of this unique guide. Modern Library Technology and Reference Services includes guidelines for taking on an advisory role in an electronic environment, requesting budgetary support for implementing new information systems, and creating training programs for paraprofessional staff and end-users. Filled with valuable information regarding library planning and budgetary considerations, “technostress” at the reference desk, and the creation of new reference service areas to reflect different service needs, this book is a must for library administrators, librarians, and end-users who want to meet the challenges of modern library technology.

This one-of-kind volume provides practical ways to enhance daily reference services, improve the image of librarianship, and bring new users into libraries. It prepares librarians for helping library users with a variety of different search protocols and user interfaces such as online public access catalogs (OPACs), the Internet, CD-ROM LANS, and online searching. All aspects of reference services in the modern electronic technological library are covered in chapters by library administrators and practicing reference librarians who share their practical experiences of how they adjusted their reference services to meet the demands of new technology. Modern Library Technology and Reference Services helps librarians develop a conceptual framework for helping researchers, use online systems and other electronic services, train paraprofessionals, integrate library technology use in the classroom, train end-users in college libraries, work in active partnership with researchers and producers of electronic databases, choose appropriate patron access databases, and effectively manage reference services in an electronic environment.

Pharmaceutical Medicine
by Adrian Kilcoyne, Phil Ambery, Daniel O’Connor

The breadth of the pharmaceutical medicine can be daunting, but this book is designed to navigate a path through the speciality. Providing a broad overview of all topics relevant to the discipline of pharmaceutical medicine, it gives you the facts fast, in a user-friendly format, without having to dive through page upon page of dense text. With 136 chapters spread across 8 sections, the text offers a thorough grounding in issues ranging from medicines regulation to clinical trial design and data management. This makes it a useful revision aid for exams as well as giving you a taster of areas of pharmaceutical medicine adjacent to your current role. For healthcare professionals already working in the field, this book offers a guiding hand in difficult situations as well as supplying rapid access to the latest recommendations and guidelines. Written by authors with experience in the industry and drug regulation, this comprehensive and authoritative guide provides a shoulder to lean on throughout your pharmaceutical career.


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