Performing Arts

Buildings for the Performing Arts
by Ian Appleton

This Design and Development Guide is an essential book for those who are involved in the initiation, planning, design and building of facilities for the various performing arts, from local to metropolitan locations. It includes the stages in the development, decisions to be taken, information requirements, feasibility and advice necessary in the design and development of a new or adapted building.

Part one of this guide provides the background information about the organisation of the performing arts, the prevailing issues, the client and various building types. In the second part, the author deals with the components of design and development, identifying the roles of the client, advisors and consultants, the stages to be achieved, including client’s proposal feasibility, the process of briefing, design and building and eventually hand-over and opening night, with a consideration of the building use. Studies include the assessment of demand, site requirements, initial brief, building design and financial viability. Information requirements, as design standards, for the auditorium and platform/stage, and the support facilities, are included. Separate studies focus on the adaptation of existing buildings and provision for children and young persons.

THE CONTENT COVERS A WIDE RANGE OF PERFORMING ARTS (CLASSICAL MUSIC, POP/ROCK, JAZZ, MUSICALS, DANCE, DRAMA) AND PROVIDES INFORMATION ON EACH AS AN ART FROM AND NECESSITIES TO HOUSE PERFORMANCES.


A to Z of American Women in the Performing Arts
by Liz Sonneborn

“A to Z of American Women in the Performing Arts is an engaging resource that provides readers with insightful biographies of select women in the performing arts from the 19th century to the present. Regionally

Seduction and Power
by Silke Knippschild, Marta Garcia Morcillo

This volume focuses on the reception of antiquity in the performing and visual arts from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century. It explores the tensions and relations of gender, sexuality, eroticism and power in reception. Such universal themes dictated plots and characters of myth and drama, but also served to portray historical figures, events and places from Classical history. Their changing reception and reinterpretation across time has created stereotypes, models of virtue or immoral conduct, that blend the original features from the ancient world with a diverse range of visual and performing arts of the modern era. The volume deconstructs these traditions and shows how arts of different periods interlink to form and transmit these images to modern audiences and viewers. Drawing on contributions from across Europe and the United States, a trademark of the book is the inclusive treatment of all the arts beyond the traditional limits of academic disciplines.


Anthropology of the Performing Arts
by Anya Peterson Royce

Anya Peterson Royce turns the anthropological gaze on the performing arts, attempting to find broad commonalities in performance, art, and artists across space, time, and culture. She asks general questions as to the nature of artistic interpretation, the differences between virtuosity and artistry, and how artists interplay with audience, aesthetics, and style. To support her case, she examines artists as diverse as Fokine and the Ballets Russes, Tewa Indian dancers, 17th century commedia dell’arte, Japanese kabuki and butoh, Zapotec shamans, and the mime of Marcel Marceau, adding her own observations as a professional dancer in the classical ballet tradition. Royce also points to the recent move toward collaboration across artistic genres as evidence of the universality of aesthetics. Her analysis leads to a better understanding of artistic interpretation, artist-audience relationships, and the artistic imagination as cross-cultural phenomena. Over 29 black and white photographs and drawings illustrate the wide range of Royce’s cross-cultural approach. Her well-crafted volume will be of great interest to anthropologists, arts researchers, and students of cultural studies and performing arts.

Culture.Shift. Creative Leadership for Audience-Centric Performing Arts Organisations
by Benita Lipps

Culture.Shift is a practical, hands-on guide to strategic audience development for the performing arts in Europe. It aims to be a companion to creative leaders interested in developing their audiences and creating deeper connections with their communities. It wants to encourage and support performing arts organisations on the road to a more strategic approach to audience and community engagement. Created by creative leaders for their peers, it combines insights, tips, debates and best practice examples. By presenting the stories of houses that have already had their ‘Culture.Shift’, the book wants to inspire others to follow their example and contribute to the European debate on audience development.


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