Sex Book Name Hindi

2 States
by Chetan Bhagat

Fourth book by the bestselling author Chetan Bhagat. 2 States is a story about Krish and Ananya. They are from two different states of India, deeply in love and want to get married. Of course, their parents don’t agree. To convert their love story into a love marriage, the couple have a tough battle in front of them.

The Kamasutra of Vatsyayana
by Vātsyāyana

This book combines the Hindu sage Vatsyayana’s celebrated treatise with illustrations from various schools of painting on the theme of sexual pleasure. The intention of these works was to provide instruction as well as enjoyment. Its view of sexuality is both jaunty and pragmatic, its analysis of sexual politics often chillingly realistic.

Same-Sex Love in India
by R. Vanita, S. Kidwai

Same-Sex Love in India presents a stunning array of writings on same-sex love from over 2000 years of Indian literature. Translated from more than a dozen languages and drawn from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and modern fictional traditions, these writings testify to the presence of same-sex love in various forms since ancient times, without overt persecution. This collection defies both stereotypes of Indian culture and Foucault’s definition of homosexuality as a nineteenth-century invention, uncovering instead complex discourses of Indian homosexuality, rich metaphorical traditions to represent it, and the use of names and terms as early as medieval times to distinguish same-sex from cross-sex love. An eminent group of scholars have translated these writings for the first time or have re-translated well-known texts to correctly make evident previously underplayed homoerotic content. Selections range from religious books, legal and erotic treatises, story cycles, medieval histories and biographies, modern novels, short stories, letters, memoirs, plays and poems. From the Rigveda to Vikram Seth, this anthology will become a staple in courses on gender and queer studies, Asian studies, and world literature.

Same-Sex Love in India
by NA NA

Lambda literary award finalist, Same-Sex Love in India presents a stunning array of writings on same-sex love from over 2000 years of Indian literature. Translated from more than a dozen languages and drawn from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, and modern fictional traditions, these writings testify to the presence of same-sex love in various forms since ancient times, without overt persecution. This collection defies both stereotypes of Indian culture and Foucault’s definition of homosexuality as a 19th-century invention, uncovering instead complex discourses of Indian homosexuality, rich metaphorical traditions to represent it, and the use of names and terms as early as medieval times to distinguish same-sex from cross-sex love. An eminent group of scholars have translated these writings for the first time or have re-translated well-known texts to correctly make evident previously underplayed homoerotic content. Selections range from religious books, legal and erotic treatises, story cycles, medieval histories and biographies, modern novels, short stories, letters, memoirs, plays and poems. From the Rigveda to Vikram Seth, this anthology will become a staple in courses on gender and queer studies, Asian studies, and world literature.

Sex Science Self
by Bob Ostertag

In Sex Science Self, Bob Ostertag cautions against accepting and defending any technology uncritically — even, maybe even especially, a technology that has become integrally related to identity. Specifically, he examines the development of estrogen and testosterone as pharmaceuticals.

Ostertag situates this history alongside the story of an increasingly visible and political lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender population. He persuasively argues that scholarship on the development of sex hormone chemicals does not take into account LGBT history and activism, nor has work in LGBT history fully considered the scientific research that has long attempted to declare a chemical essence of gender. In combining these histories, Ostertag reveals the complex motivations behind hormone research over generations and expresses concern about the growing profits from estrogen and testosterone, which now are marketed with savvy ad campaigns to increase their use across multiple demographics.

Ostertag does not argue against the use of pharmaceutical hormones. Instead he points out that at a time when they are increasingly available, it is more important than ever to understand the history and current use of these powerful chemicals so that everyone — within the LGBT community and beyond — can make informed choices.

In this short, thoughtful, and engaging book, Ostertag tells a fascinating story while opening up a wealth of new questions and debates about gender, sexuality, and medical treatments.


Kamasutra
by Mallanaga Vatsyayana

The Kamasutra is the oldest extant textbook of erotic love. But it is more than a book about sex. It is about the art of living–about finding a partner, maintaining power in a marriage, committing adultery, living as or with a courtesan, using drugs–and also, of course, about the many and varied positions available to lovers in sexual intercourse and the pleasures to be derived from each.
The Kamasutra was composed in Sanskrit, the literary language of ancient India, sometime in the third century, probably in North India. It combines an encyclopedic coverage of all imaginable aspects of sex with a closely observed sexual psychology and a dramatic, novelistic narrative of seduction, consummation, and disentanglement. Best known in English through the highly mannered, padded, and inaccurate nineteenth-century translation by Sir Richard Burton, the text is newly translated here into clear, vivid, sexually frank English. This edition also includes a section of vivid Indian color illustrations along with three uniquely important commentaries: translated excerpts from the earliest and most famous Sanskrit commentary (thirteenth century) and from a twentieth-century Hindi commentary, and explanatory notes by the two translators.
The lively and entertaining introduction by translator Wendy Doniger, one of the world’s foremost Sanskrit scholars, discusses the history of The Kamasutra and its reception in India and Europe, analyses its attitudes toward gender and sexual violence, and sets it in the context of ancient Indian social theory, scientific method, and sexual ethics.
“[This] new translation is fascinating, thought-provoking and occasionally even amusing.”–Salon.com

The Second Sex
by Simone de Beauvoir

Of all the writing that emerged from the existentialist movement, Simone de Beauvoir’s groundbreaking study of women will probably have the most extensive and enduring impact. It is at once a work of anthropology and sociology, of biology and psychoanalysis, from the pen of a writer and novelist of pennetrating imaginative power.THE SECOND SEX stands, five decades after its first appearance, as the first landmark in the modern feminist upsurge that has transformed perceptions of the social relationship of man and womankind in our time

Gay and Lesbian Asia
by Gerard Sullivan, Peter A. Jackson

How do Asian cultures construct queer genders, sexualities, and eroticism?

Gay and Lesbian Asia demonstrates the astonishing diversity of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered identities in countries including Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, China, India, Indonesia, Singapore, and the Philippines. Although many Asian cultures borrow the language of the West when discussing queerness, the attitudes, relationships, and roles described are quite different.

Gay and Lesbian Asia discusses cultural issues as well as the unique political position of gays in Asian societies. For example, the Thai concept of phet–eroticized gender–is quite different from the Western view that classifies people by the sex of the partners they desire, not by their level of masculine or feminine traits. Similarly, some gay and lesbian Chinese people “come home” rather than “come out.” By bringing their partners into the extended family, they can maintain the filial relationships that define them while being able to love whom they choose.

The essays in Gay and Lesbian Asia cover a broad range of approaches and subjects:

  • globalization theory exploring the political and cultural ramifications of the Western gay identity movement
  • Foucauldian discourse on sexuality and sharply distinct erotic cultures
  • political and cultural analyses of gay and lesbian comradeship and filial relationships in Chinese societies
  • research on the “T” and “po” lesbians (similar to butch and femme) in Malaysian bars
  • the formation of gay cybercommunities in Asia
  • the effects of class distinctions on Jakarta lesbians
  • studies of local historical forms of homoeroticism and transgenderism

    Gay and Lesbian Asia continues Haworth”s landmark series of books on gay and lesbian issues in Asia and Australia. Along with Tongzhi: Politics of Same-Sex Eroticism in Chinese Societies; Queer Asian Cinema; Multicultural Queer: Australian Narratives; Gays and Lesbians in Asia and the Pacific; and Lady Boys, Tom Boys, Rent Boys: Male and Female Homosexualities in Contemporary Thailand, this book presents some of the most original, powerful current thought available on cultural, political, sexual, and gender issues for queer subcultures within Asian cultures.

them while being able to love whom they choose.

The essays in Gay and Lesbian Asia cover a broad range of approaches and subjects:

  • globalization theory exploring the political and cultural ramifications of the Western gay identity movement
  • Foucauldian discourse on sexuality and sharply distinct erotic cultures
  • political and cultural analyses of gay and lesbian comradeship and filial relationships in Chinese societies
  • research on the “T” and “po” lesbians (similar to butch and femme) in Malaysian bars
  • the formation of gay cybercommunities in Asia
  • the effects of class distinctions on Jakarta lesbians
  • studies of local historical forms of homoeroticism and transgenderism

    Gay and Lesbian Asia continues Haworth”s landmark series of books on gay and lesbian issues in Asia and Australia. Along with Tongzhi: Politics of Same-Sex Eroticism in Chinese Societies; Queer Asian Cinema; Multicultural Queer: Australian Narratives; Gays and Lesbians in Asia and the Pacific; and Lady Boys, Tom Boys, Rent Boys: Male and Female Homosexualities in Contemporary Thailand, this book presents some of the most original, powerful current thought available on cultural, political, sexual, and gender issues for queer subcultures within Asian cultures.

lticultural Queer: Australian Narratives; Gays and Lesbians in Asia and the Pacific; and Lady Boys, Tom Boys, Rent Boys: Male and Female Homosexualities in Contemporary Thailand, this book presents some of the most original, powerful current thought available on cultural, political, sexual, and gender issues for queer subcultures within Asian cultures.


How To Have A Baby: Overcoming Infertility
by Anirudha Malpani

This comprehensive and easy to understand 400 plus page book offers new hope for infertile couples. Beginning with the basics of making a baby, the book describes what couples can do to help themselves; how to choose a doctor; and how to choose the best medical treatment option. All the latest technological advances, including PGD, ICSI, blastocyst transfer and laser assisted hatching are described in detail. Alternative options for building a family; and practical suggestions to cope with the stress and stigma of infertility complete the book. The message of this book is simple – infertile couples should not lose hope and should actively participate in the treatment of their infertility as well-informed patients.


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