Steven D Levitt

Freakonomics
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool?

What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common?

How much do parents really matter?

These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He studies the riddles of everyday life–from cheating and crime to parenting and sports–and reaches conclusions that turn conventional wisdom on its head. Freakonomics is a groundbreaking collaboration between Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, an award-winning author and journalist. They set out to explore the inner workings of a crack gang, the truth about real estate agents, the secrets of the Ku Klux Klan, and much more. Through forceful storytelling and wry insight, they show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives–how people get what they want or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing.


SuperFreakonomics
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Four years in the making, ‘SuperFreakonomics’ asks not only the tough questions, but the unexpected ones – What’s more dangerous, driving drunk or walking drunk? Why is chemotherapy prescribed so often if it’s so ineffective? Can a sex change boost your salary? How is a street prostitute like a department-store Santa? Why are doctors so bad at washing their hands? How much good do car seats do? What’s the best way to catch a terrorist? Did TV cause a rise in crime? What do hurricanes, heart attacks, and highway deaths have in common? Are people hard-wired for altruism or selfishness? Can eating kangaroo save the planet? Which adds more value – a pimp or a Realtor? Levitt and Dubner mix smart thinking and storytelling, whether investigating a solution to global warming or explaining why the price of oral sex has fallen so drastically. By examining how people respond to incentives, they show the world for what it really is – good, bad, ugly, and, in the final analysis, super freaky.

Think Like A Freak
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner single-handedly showed the world that applying counter-intuitive approaches to everyday problems can bear surprising results.

Think Like a Freak will take readers further inside this special thought process, revealing a new way of approaching the decisions we make, the plans we create and the morals we choose. It answers the question on the lips of everyone who’s read the previous books: How can I apply these ideas to my life? How do I make smarter, harder and better decisions? How can I truly think like a freak?

With short, highly entertaining insights running the gamut from “The Upside of Quitting” to “How to Succeed with No Talent,” Think Like a Freak is poised to radically alter the way we think about all aspects of life on this planet.


When to Rob a Bank CD
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

When Freakonomics was initially published, the authors started a blog—and they’ve kept it up. The writing is more casual, more personal, even more outlandish than in their books. Now, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the landmark Freakonomics, comes this curated collection from the most readable economics blog in the world.

Why don’t flight attendants get tipped? If you were a terrorist, how would you attack? And why does KFC always run out of fried chicken?

Over the past decade, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner have published more than 8,000 blog posts on Freakonomics.com. Now the very best of this writing has been carefully curated into one volume, the perfect solution for the millions of readers who love all things Freakonomics.

Discover why taller people tend to make more money; why it’s so hard to predict the Kentucky Derby winner; and why it might be time for a sex tax (if not a fat tax). You’ll also learn a great deal about Levitt and Dubner’s own quirks and passions. Surprising and erudite, eloquent and witty, When to Rob a Bank demonstrates the brilliance that has made their books an international sensation.


A 30-Minute Summary of Steven D. Levitt and Steven J. Dubner’s Think Like a Freak
by Steven D. Levitt, Steven J. Dubner

PLEASE NOTE: This is a summary of the book and NOT the original book.Think Like a Freak: A 30-minute Summary of Steven D. Levitt and Steven J. Dubner’s bookInside this Instaread Summary:

  • Overview of the entire book
  • Introduction to the Important people in the book
  • Summary and analysis of all the chapters in the book
  • Key Takeaways of the book
  • A Reader’s Perspective

Preview of this summary:Chapter 1

After writing Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics, Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner were asked many questions about how to deal with a wide variety of problems. Since problem solving is difficult and time-consuming, they decided to write a book to teach thinking skills instead of trying to offer solutions to specific problems.

The first important idea to keep in mind is that selfish incentives are not as effective as communal incentives when considering how to solve a problem. Most people tend to put their own interests before the interests of others. This is human nature and often makes it difficult to get several people to move in the same direction towards a specific goal. There is no right or wrong way to think about solving a problem. In the modern world, people must become more productive, creative, and rational in their thinking.

The first two books written by Levitt and Dubner were based on a few basic ideas. First, incentives are the foundation of modern life, and figuring them out is the key to understanding and solving any problem. Next, conventional wisdom often turns out to be incorrect and blindly following it can lead to disastrous outcomes. Finally, correlation does not equal causality. In other words, just because two things are identified together does not mean that one causes the other. This book builds on these three basic principles, but is more prescriptive than the previous two titles.

The book is inspired by an economic approach relying on data rather than an ideology to understand how the world works, how resources are allocated, and the obstacles that can get in the way of getting resources to those who need them. The good news is that thinking like a freak is so easy that anyone can do it. The question is why so few people actually do it….


SuperFreakonomics LP
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Freakonomics was a worldwide sensation, selling more than four million copies.

Now Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner return with SuperFreakonomics, and fans and newcomers alike will find that this freakquel is even bolder, funnier, and more surprising than the first.

SuperFreakonomics challenges the way we think all over again, with such questions as:

  • How is a street prostitute like a department-store Santa?
  • What’s the best way to catch a terrorist?
  • What do hurricanes, heart attacks, and highway deaths have in common?
  • Are people hardwired for altruism or selfishness?
  • Can eating kangaroo save the planet?

Levitt and Dubner mix smart thinking and great storytelling like no one else, whether investigating a solution to global warming or explaining why the price of oral sex has fallen so drastically.


Freakonomics LP POD
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? What kind of impact did Roe v. Wade have on violent crime?

These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much heralded scholar who studies the stuff and riddles of everyday life—from cheating and crime to sports and child rearing—and whose conclusions regularly turn the conventional wisdom on its head. He usually begins with a mountain of data and a simple, unasked question. Some of these questions concern life-and-death issues; others have an admittedly freakish quality. Thus the new field of study contained in this book: freakonomics.

Through forceful storytelling and wry insight, Levitt and co-author Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives—how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing. In Freakonomics, they set out to explore the hidden side of … well, everything. The inner workings of a crack gang. The truth about real-estate agents. The myths of campaign finance. The telltale marks of a cheating schoolteacher. The secrets of the Ku Klux Klan.

What unites all these stories is a belief that the modern world, despite a surfeit of obfuscation, complication, and downright deceit, is not impenetrable, is not unknowable, and—if the right questions are asked—is even more intriguing than we think. All it takes is a new way of looking. Steven Levitt, through devilishly clever and clear-eyed thinking, shows how to see through all the clutter.

Freakonomics establishes this unconventional premise: If morality represents how we would like the world to work, then economics represents how it actually does work. It is true that readers of this book will be armed with enough riddles and stories to last a thousand cocktail parties. But Freakonomics can provide more than that. It will literally redefine the way we view the modern world.


SuperFreakonomics, Illustrated edition
by Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner

Superfreakonomics—the smash hit follow-up to the remarkable New York Times bestselling phenomenon Freakonomics—is back in a new full-color, fully illustrated and expanded edition. The brainchild of rogue economist Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner that once again brilliantly challenges our view of the way the world really works is presented with a new, visual, superfreaky dimension added, enhancing the already provocative thinking about street prostitutes, hurricanes, heart attacks, and other seemingly mundane matters that made Freakonomics and Superfreakonomics part of the national zeitgeist.


Microeconomics
by Austan Goolsbee, Steven Levitt, Chad Syverson

Like no other text for the intermediate microeconomics course, Goolsbee, Levitt, and Syverson’s Microeconomics bridges the gap between today’s theory and practice, with a strong empirical dimension that lets students tests theory and successfully apply it. With carefully crafted features and vivid examples, Goolsbee, Levitt, and Syverson’s text helps answer two critical questions students ask, “Do people and firms really act as theory suggests?” and “How can someone use microeconomics in a practical way?”

The authors teach in economics departments and business schools and are active empirical microeconomics researchers. Their grounding in different areas of empirical research allows them to present the evidence developed in the last 20 years that has tested and refined fundamental theories. Their teaching and professional experiences are reflected in an outstanding presentation of theories and applications.


Economics of Criminal Law
by Steven D. Levitt, Thomas J. Miles, Thomas John Miles

The volume presents the seminal articles in the economic analysis of the criminal law. The articles include the path-breaking theoretical economic analyses of criminal behavior and the leading empirical tests of these theories. The volume also contains the most prominent economic analyses of the substantive doctrines of criminal law and criminal procedure. Other articles present influential applications of economic concepts and evidence to perennial issues in criminal law and criminal justice, such as gun control, drug prohibition, and sentencing policy. An introduction by the volume editors provides a comprehensive overview of the works included. Economics of Criminal Law will be an essential source of reference for scholars, graduate students in both law and in economics, and practitioners.


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