Victim Zero

Victim Zero
by Kat Ward

Kat Ward was the first victim to speak out about the abuse she suffered at the hands of Jimmy Savile. Her shocking testimony was the catalyst for the uncovering of decades of abuse and cover-ups. Kat Ward’s childhood was marked by physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. She was eventually taken into local authority care to a children’s home in Norfolk, and first encountered Savile while on a “holiday” with the home on Jersey. Later, she was moved to Duncroft Approved School in Surrey, a secure unit. Amazingly, Savile turned up there too; he would regularly drive up in his Rolls-Royce and offer sweets and cigarettes in return for sexual favors. Kat’s revelations had already appeared in a memoir she’d placed online using Savile’s initials, but she first spoke on camera as part of Newsnight’s infamous shelved Savile expose. However, it was ITV’s Exposure: The Other Side of Jimmy Savile (in which Kat did not take part), that led to his unmasking as a serial sex offender and opened the floodgates for hundreds of other victims to come forward, and for many other offenders to be unmasked. Freddie Starr brought a High Court case against her for libel and slander, seeking GBP300,000 in damages, calling her “liar” and “nutter.” It failed spectacularly in July 2015, with costs awarded against him. Although the last few years have been trying, they have ultimately brought Kat vindication after years of being labeled an attention-seeker and liar. Her book, which charts her life from the 1960s to the end of Starr’s failed action, is a unique, harrowing, and immensely moving perspective on one of the biggest news stories of the last decade.

Zero Victim
by Jr James Ward

At some point we all wonder, “Why me?” We are all destined to confront pain in our lives. Some of us experience unspeakable tragedy while others are subject to ridicule, discrimination, mockery-even violence. At times, even the ones we love the most treat us with scorn and disrespect. Let’s face it. We live in a hostile world where imperfect people develop imperfect systems. We all endure difficulties at no fault of our own, turning us each into victims. But have you noticed how some people rise above their victimization while others sink into mental and spiritual defeat? Despite similar circumstances, some people thrive while others wither away. In Zero Victim, author and corporate executive James Ward shows how repeated victimization destroys your positive outlook by permanently creating negative memories and damaged emotions. He exposes victimization as the real problem-not your set of unfortunate circumstances. In this revolutionary book, Ward shows you how to develop a programmed mind-set to overcome injustice and recognize victory in every situation. His revolutionary “Zero Victim Mentality” will set you free from your days of fear, depression, and discouragement. James E. Ward Jr. is an author, musician, and former corporate executive who speaks nationally on cultural and spiritual issues. Ward holds a Master of Divinity degree and resides outside of Chicago with his wife and two children.

Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic
by Richard A. McKay

Much has been written about Gaetan Dugas, the sexually insatiable French Canadian flight attendant who came to be known as “Patient Zero,” the man who has been blamed for sparking the AIDS epidemic in the United States. Newspapers around the world picked up on journalist Randy Shilts’s narrative of Dugas as the “Quebecois version of Typhoid Mary.” But late in October of 2016, newspapers around the world galvanized again, this time picking up on a stunning development: it turns out that the AIDS virus was circulating within U.S. borders a full decade before it was officially recognized in 1981. Two researchers for Nature made the announcement that Dugas was not the source of the pandemic in North America. New techniques of RNA analysis allowed for assembling the complete HIV genome and tracking its history. One of the two researchers is our historian author, Richard McKay, and he has now come forward to tell the full story of how the idea of an epidemic’s “Patient Zero” swiftly came to exert such a strong grip on the scientific, media, and popular consciousness. This book does a spectacular job of reconstructing the role of Gaetan Dugas, surely the most demonized patient in history, and of how institutions like the CDC created meaning and allocated blame when dealing with a new epidemic disease. There is truly riveting biographical material here about Dugas and also about Shilts, all from primary written and oral sources. McKay illuminates powerful ruptures within the LGBT community that were laid bare by the AIDS epidemic, and he gives us the first holistic account of responses to that epidemic, expanding our knowledge of VD surveillance in mid-20th century as well as imparting intimate understanding of the illness experience of Dugas, who died in 1984. A potential publicity bonanza, Patient Zero is myth-smashing revisionist history at its best.

Zero the Lock Dog
by Jean Marcel

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Claudine, a beautiful golden retriever, a faithful lock dog
in Canal du Midi, gave birth to five puppies. One of them only had three legs.
For Jean Claude Duval, the lockkeeper of L’Ecluse des Duval, dogs equals
additional income. He was able to sell all the puppies, except for the
three-legged one, which he called Zero. Contrary to what his master thought,
the dog survived and learned the trade of being a lock dog like his mother.

As time went on, Duval, his wife, Jeanette, and his son,
Albert, noticed something special about Zero. He could understand humans. While
doing his work, he befriended a tow horse named Lulu, the bringer of news and a
teller of many a story along the canal. Fascinated by the tales and humans, who
most interest him, he decided to take an adventure of his own and rode the La
Bonne Fortune, a barge by Capitaine Lambert. In one of the locks, he fought and
defeated Bruno, the most hated dog in the canal, making him a legend among the
bargemen and lockkeepers alike.

But Zero is more than a fighter, he has a higher
purpose, and for this he became a source of both comfort and joy for those
whose lives he touched.


Coexistence of IMT-Advanced Systems for Spectrum Sharing with FSS Receivers in C-Band and Extended C-Band
by Lway Faisal Abdulrazak

This book provides information regarding spectrum sharing between wireless systems, motivated by emerging new technologies. Readers will benefit from information about how to conduct research on the interference mitigation between IMT-Advanced and FSS. The author presents a deterministic analysis for interference to noise ratio (I/N), adjacent channel interference ratio (ACIR), field strength, and path loss propagation, in order to determine the separation distances in the co-channel interference (CCI) and adjacent channel Interference (ACI) scenarios. An analytical model is discussed, for the shielding mitigation technique based on the deterministic analysis of the propagation model. The shielding technique has been developed based on test bed measurements for evaluating the attenuation of the proposed materials. MatlabTM and Transfinite Visualyse ProTM have been used as simulation tools for the verification of the obtained results, whereas the IMT-Advanced parameters have been represented by Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) 802.16e.


And The Band Played on
by Randy Shilts

By the time Rock Hudson’s death in 1985 alerted all America to the danger of the AIDS epidemic, the disease had spread across the nation, killing thousands of people and emerging as the greatest health crisis of the 20th century. America faced a troubling question: What happened? How was this epidemic allowed to spread so far before it was taken seriously? In answering these questions, Shilts weaves weaves the disparate threads into a coherent story, pinning down every evasion and contradiction at the highest levels of the medical, political, and media establishments.

Shilts shows that the epidemic spread wildly because the federal government put budget ahead of the nation’s welfare; health authorities placed political expediency before the public health; and scientists were often more concerned with international prestige than saving lives. Against this backdrop, Shilts tells the heroic stories of individuals in science and politics, public health and the gay community, who struggled to alert the nation to the enormity of the danger it faced. And the Band Played On is both a tribute to these heroic people and a stinging indictment of the institutions that failed the nation so badly.
Randy Shilts was born in 1951, in Davenport, Iowa. One of the first openly gay journalists hired at a major newspaper, he worked for the San Francisco Chronicle for thirteen years. He died of AIDS in 1994 at his home in the Sonoma County redwoods in California. He was the author of The Mayor of Castro Street: The Life and Times of Harvey Milk (1982), And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic (1987), and Conduct Unbecoming: Lesbians and Gays in the U.S. Military (1993). He also wrote extensively for many major newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, Newsweek, Esquire, The Los Angeles Times, and The Advocate.
By the time Rock Hudson’s death in 1985 alerted all America to the danger of the AIDS epidemic, the disease had spread across the nation, killing thousands of people and emerging as the greatest health crisis of the 20th century. America faced a troubling question: What happened? How was this epidemic allowed to spread so far before it was taken seriously? In answering these questions, Shilts weaves the disparate threads into a coherent story, pinning down every evasion and contradiction at the highest levels of the medical, political, and media establishments.

Shilts shows that the epidemic spread wildly because the federal government put budget ahead of the nation’s welfare; health authorities placed political expediency before the public health; and scientists were often more concerned with international prestige than saving lives. Against this backdrop, Shilts tells the heroic stories of individuals in science and politics, public health and the gay community, who struggled to alert the nation to the enormity of the danger it faced. And the Band Played On is both a tribute to these heroic people and a stinging indictment of the institutions that failed the nation so badly.
“A heroic work of journalism on what must rank as one of the foremost catastrophes of modern history.”—The New York Times
“A heroic work of journalism on what must rank as one of the foremost catastrophes of modern history.”—The New York Times

“Stunning . . . An impressively researched and richly detailed narrative.”—Time

“Rivals in power and intensity, and in the brilliance of its reporting and writing, Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood.”—The Boston Globe

“A monumental history.”—The Washington Post Book World

“The most thorough, comprehensive exploration of the AIDS epidemic to date . . . It is fascinating, frightening, and essential reading.”—San Francisco Sentinel

“A textbook on how institutions work—or fail to work—in the face of such a threat.”—San Francisco Examiner

“A lucid and stunning indictment of public policy toward the vicious disease . . . A valuable work of political history.”—Business Week

“Shilts successfully weaves comprehensive investigative reporting and commercial page-turning pacing, political intrigue, and personal tragedy into a landmark book . . . Its importance cannot be overstated.”—Publishers Weekly

“A popular history of the early years of the AIDS crisis, the book conveys in detail the political complexities—and many different human dimensions—of the story. Reading Shilts, you wonder who will die next. You worry whether this terrible disease can ever be controlled. And you begin to feel anger at what Shilts portrays as the federal government’s dithering . . . Shilts has produced the best—and what will likely be the most controversial—book yet on AIDS. Though many of the details in the book are familiar to veteran reporters, Shilts does not shy away from naming names and casting blame. He writes with passionate conviction, which is one of the book’s strengths—and also, of course, a sound reason for some skepticism.”—Jim Miller, Newsweek

“Shilts, a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle who has covered AIDS full-time since 1983, takes us almost day by day through the first five years of the unfolding epidemic and the responses—confusion and fear, denial and indifference, courage and determination. It is at once a history and a passionate indictment.”—H. Jack Geiger, The New York Times Book Review


Shattered
by Allison Brennan

New York Times bestseller Allison Brennan’s two series collide in Shattered, a powerful, enthralling read about the craving for revenge and the desire for justice.

Over a span of twenty years, four boys have been kidnapped from their bedrooms, suffocated, and buried nearby in a shallow grave. Serial killer or coincidence?

That’s the question investigative reporter Maxine Revere sets out to answer when an old friend begs her to help exonerate his wife, who has been charged with their son’s recent murder. But Max can do little to help because the police and D.A. won’t talk to her—they think they have the right woman. Instead, Max turns her attention to three similar cold cases. If she can solve them, she might be able to help her friend.

Justin Stanton was killed twenty years ago, and his father wants closure—so he is willing to help Max with her investigation on one condition: that she work with his former sister-in-law— Justin’s aunt, FBI Agent Lucy Kincaid. Trouble is, Max works alone, and she’s livid that her only access to the case files, lead detective and witnesses depends on her partnering with a federal agent on vacation. She wants the career-making story almost as much as the truth—but if she gets this wrong, she could lose everything.

Haunted by Justin’s death for years, Lucy yearns to give her family—and herself—the closure they need. More important, she wants to catch a killer. Lucy finds Max’s theory on all three cases compelling—with Max’s research added to Lucy’s training and experience, Lucy believes they can find the killer so justice can finally be served. But the very private Lucy doesn’t trust the reporter any more than Max trusts her.
Max and Lucy must find a way to work together to untangle lies, misinformation, and evidence to develop a profile of the killer. But the biggest question is: why were these boys targeted? As they team up to find out what really happened the night Justin was killed, they make a shocking discovery: Justin’s killer is still out there … stalking another victim … and they already may be too late.


Crimes of the Centuries: Notorious Crimes, Criminals, and Criminal Trials in American History [3 volumes]
by Steven Chermak Ph.D., Frankie Y. Bailey Ph.D.

This unique reference features the most famous crimes and trials in the United States since colonial times. Three comprehensive volumes focus on the most notorious and historically significant crimes that have influenced America’s justice system, including the life and wrongdoing of Lizzie Borden, the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, the killing spree and execution of Ted Bundy, and the Columbine High School shootings.

Organized by case, the work includes a chronology of major unlawful deeds, fascinating primary source documents, dozens of sidebars with case trivia and little-known facts, and an overview of crimes that have shaped criminal justice in the United States over several centuries. Each of the 500 entries provides information about the crime, the perpetrators, and those affected by the misconduct, along with a short bibliography to extend learning opportunities. The set addresses a breadth of famous trials across American history, including the Salem witch trials, the conviction of Sacco and Vanzetti, and the prosecution of O. J. Simpson.


White
by Bret Easton Ellis

Own it, snowflakes: you’ve lost everything you claim to hold dear.

White is Bret Easton Ellis’s first work of nonfiction. Already the bad boy of American literature, from Less Than Zero to American Psycho, Ellis has also earned the wrath of right-thinking people everywhere with his provocations on social media, and here he escalates his admonishment of received truths as expressed by today’s version of “the left.” Eschewing convention, he embraces views that will make many in literary and media communities cringe, as he takes aim at the relentless anti-Trump fixation, coastal elites, corporate censorship, Hollywood, identity politics, Generation Wuss, “woke” cultural watchdogs, the obfuscation of ideals once both cherished and clear, and the fugue state of American democracy. In a young century marked by hysterical correctness and obsessive fervency on both sides of an aisle that’s taken on the scale of the Grand Canyon, White is a clarion call for freedom of speech and artistic freedom.
 
“The central tension in Ellis’s art—or his life, for that matter—is that while [his] aesthetic is the cool reserve of his native California, detachment over ideology, he can’t stop generating heat…. He’s hard-wired to break furniture.”—Karen Heller, The Washington Post
 
“Sweating with rage . . . humming with paranoia.”—Anna Leszkiewicz, The Guardian
 
“Snowflakes on both coasts in withdrawal from Rachel Maddow’s nightly Kremlinology lesson can purchase a whole book to inspire paroxysms of rage . . . a veritable thirst trap for the easily microaggressed. It’s all here. Rants about Trump derangement syndrome; MSNBC; #MeToo; safe spaces.”—Bari Weiss, The New York Times
 


Zero Tolerance
by Andrea Mcardle, Tanya Erzen

Amadou Diallo, Abner Louima, Anthony Baez, Patrick Dorismond. New York City has been rocked in recent years by the fate of these four men at the hands of the police. But police brutality in New York City is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that refers not only to the hyperviolent response of white male police officers as in these cases, but to an entire set of practices that target homeless people, vendors, and sexual minorities.
The complexity of the problem requires a commensurate response, which Zero Tolerance fulfills with a range of scholarship and activism. Offering perspectives from law and society, women’s studies, urban and cultural studies, labor history, and the visual arts, the essays assembled here complement, and provide a counterpoint, to the work of police scholars on this subject.
Framed as both a response and a challenge to official claims that intensified law enforcement has produced New York City’s declining crime rates, Zero Tolerance instead posits a definition of police brutality more encompassing than the use of excessive physical force. Further, it develops the connections between the most visible and familiar forms of police brutality that have sparked a new era of grassroots community activism, and the day-to-day violence that accompanies the city’s campaign to police the “quality of life.”
Contributors include: Heather Barr, Paul G. Chevigny, Derrick Bell, Tanya Erzen, Dayo F. Gore, Amy S. Green, Paul Hoffman, Andrew Hsiao, Tamara Jones, Joo-Hyun Kang, Andrea McArdle, Bradley McCallum, Andrew Ross, Eric Tang, Jacqueline Tarry, Sasha Torres, and Jennifer R. Wynn.



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